gas-discharge laser

gas-discharge laser

[¦gas ′dis‚chärj ‚lā·zər]
(optics)
A gas laser in which optical pumping is caused by nonequilibrium processes in a gas discharge.
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There is also substantial research interest in this field related to the difference between the level-population mechanisms under nuclear pumping and the population processes in a common gas-discharge laser. Current lasers with nuclear pumping [2] radiate in the spectral band of 391-5600 nm, at approximately 50 transitions of Xe, Ar, Kr, Ne, C, N, Cl, O, I, and Hg atoms, [Cd.sup.+], [Zn.sup.+], and [Hg.sup.+] ions, CO molecules, and [N.sub.2.sup.+] molecular ions.
The fundamental distinctive feature of lasers that operate via pumping by nuclear-reaction products or electron beams compared with gas-discharge lasers is that the population in many active media is determined not by electron impact at the lower levels but in the process of plasma recombination ("from the top downward").
Earlier this month, Gould finally received a patent for inventing the gas-discharge laser. He had originally applied for the patent in 1959.
In 1959, inventor Gordon Gould applied for a patent that covered gas-discharge lasers. The Patent and Trademark Office denied Gould the patent.