Fundic Glands

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Related to Gastric glands: pancreas, Salivary glands, Intestinal glands

Fundic Glands

 

glands found in the gastric mucosa. The fundic glands are situated in the fundus and body of the stomach, where they constitute the bulk of the glands. The glands are tubules that are unbranched at the ends. In the human stomach the average length of each fundic gland is 0.65 mm, and the average diameter is about 30–50 micrometers. There are 35 million fundic glands, covering a secretory area of about 3.5 sq m. The glands consist of a variety of cells that secrete gastric juice and perform endocrinous functions. The main cells elaborate pepsinogen, the accessory cells mucoid substances, and the parietal cells chlorides. Different kinds of enterochromaffin cells produce hormones, for example, gastrin. The fundic glands open into the gastric pits, whose epithelial cells elaborate mucus, one of the functions of which is to protect stomach tissues against the digestive activity of gastric juice.

References in periodicals archive ?
On the submicroscopic morphogenesis of parietal cell in the gastric gland of the human fetus.
Bhathal, "Selective colonization by Helicobacter pylori of the deep gastric glands and intracellular canaliculi of parietal cells in the setting of chronic proton pump inhibitor use," European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, vol.
Herbal formula of these supplements supports functions of gastric glands which produce pepsin and support enzyme activities that help in digestion.
where 1.1: Normal and compact arrangement of columnar epithelial cells (CEC) with distinct nucleus under light microscopy and presence of rounded gastric glands (G) separated by lamina propria (LP) (C x 1000), 1.2: Showing degenerated CEC (arrow), vacuolization (broken arrow), thin top plate (arrow head) and lesions in gastric gland (white arrow) under normal microscopy (AL x 400), 1.3: Compact CEC with distinct nucleus under light microscopy (AF x 1000), 1.4: SEM observation showing normal mucosal folds (MF) surrounded by oval or round shaped CEC and stubby microvilli (MV).
Spirochetes in the gastric glands of macacus rhesus and of man without related diseases.
Semiquantitative immunohistomorphological microscopic analysis was performed by estimation intensity of all GLP-1R immunostained glandular cells in each animal specimen by counting minimum 100 immunostained cells separately in each area (neck, mid, and bottom) of gastric glands. Level of GLP-1 immunostaining intensity was estimated by a progressive scale: 0 = negative staining (background level), 1 = mild staining, 2 = moderate staining, 3 = marked staining, and 4 = strong staining.
In a prior study,` MPM imaging of fresh, unfixed gastric mucosal biopsies revealed that gastric glands were not actually packed together as closely as they appear in formalin-fixed, H&E-stained specimens.
The gastric glands have dwindled away at least 15 separate times across the animal tree of life, explains Filipe Castro of the University of Porto in Portugal.
On the other hand, Figure 2 showed histopathological study of six groups that indicated the following: (a) normal control, (b) nontreated control "cotton pellet induced granuloma" that showed moderate degeneration of gastric glands, (c) treated group with indomethacin (10 mg/kg) that caused the wide spread necrosis of gastric glands, (d) treated group with C.
Both parts of the stomach demonstrated similar histological patterns, consisting of epithelial layer and lamina propria that contained gastric glands and muscularis externa, which is in agreement with previous study on A.
Colonization of the mucosa by the bacterium leads to chronic inflammation and loss of gastric glands responsible for the production of acid, leading to an atrophic gastritis.