gastric pouch

gastric pouch

[′gas·trik ′pau̇ch]
(invertebrate zoology)
One of the pouchlike diversions of a scyphozoan stomach.
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References in periodicals archive ?
During the surgery, a 30 ml gastric pouch is created; then the small bowel is divided 30-40 cm from the ligament of Trietz to create the biliary limb and Roux limb.
This is achieved by increasing the size of the gastric pouch, compared to gastric bypass, and by allowA[degrees] ing the pouch to drain into the intestine freely (compared to sleeve gastrectomy).
However, due to the small gastric pouch, voluminous emesis is rarely encountered [10].
3-8) Patients who undergo LB may develop device-related complications (10%), esophageal or gastric pouch dilation (2% to 5%), band erosion into the stomach (2%), gastric slippage (4% to 6%), pulmonary embolism (0.
The parietal cell mass within the small gastric pouch that is left attached to the oesophagus, the complete elimination of duodeno-gastric reflux owing to a long Roux limb, and decrease in intra-abdominal pressure with weight loss all contribute to an almost total reflux control in all patients.
In Village Location Guide Price pounds 95,000 "The gastric bypass would help to provide better control for cravings for sweet foods and, as it involves the creation of a small gastric pouch and by bypassing a portion of the upper small intestine, it effectively reduces the absorption of calories.
All procedures were performed using celiotomy and included a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with a 30- to 50-mL proximal gastric pouch (stapled in continuity), a biliopancreatic limb extending from the ligament of Treitz to 250 cm from the ileocecal junction, and a common channel of 50-150 cm, Dr.
As one of the most commonly performed weight-loss procedures, the surgery involves creating a small gastric pouch to allow food to bypass part of the small intestine.
The small gastric pouch has been shown to contain negligible gastric acid, and peristalsis in the Roux limb prevents bile reflux as well.
RYGB, which is one of the most commonly performed weight-loss procedures, involves the creation of a small gastric pouch and allows food to bypass part of the small intestine.
Protection of the gastric pouch is essential to prevent marginal ulcerations, which can quickly progress to bleeding or perforation (Benson-Davies & Quigley, 2008).