gauge


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Related to gauge: Gauge theory

gauge

, gage
1. a standard measurement, dimension, capacity, or quantity
2. any of various instruments for measuring a quantity
3. any of various devices used to check for conformity with a standard measurement
4. the thickness of sheet metal or the diameter of wire
5. the distance between the rails of a railway track: in Britain 4 ft. 8½ in. (1.435 m)
6. the distance between two wheels on the same axle of a vehicle, truck, etc.
7. Nautical the position of a vessel in relation to the wind and another vessel. One vessel may be windward (weather gauge) or leeward (lee gauge) of the other
8. a measure of the fineness of woven or knitted fabric, usually expressed as the number of needles used per inch
9. the width of motion-picture film or magnetic tape
10. (of a pressure measurement) measured on a pressure gauge that registers zero at atmospheric pressure; above or below atmospheric pressure

Gauge

To shape a brick by rubbing or molding it into a particular size.

Gauge

 

a scaleless measuring device designed for checking the dimensions, shape, and relative positions of the parts of articles. The checking consists in a comparison of the dimensions of a product with a measuring gauge in terms of the fit or degree of contact of their surfaces. This comparison makes possible classification of products as acceptable (if the dimensions lie within tolerance limits), defective (with repair possible), or irreparable.

The most widely used limit (go-no go) gauges are go gauges, which are made according to the minimum limiting size of an opening or the maximum size of a shaft and fit into acceptable products, and no-go gauges, which are made for the maximum size of an opening or the minimum size of a shaft and will not fit into acceptable products. Gauges are also classified according to purposes: working gauges, used for testing products at the manufacturing plant; acceptance gauges, used by the consumer for rechecking products; and reference gauges, which are used for testing or regulation of working and acceptance gauges. The advantages of gauges are simplicity of design and the possibility of integrated checking of products of complex shape; disadvantages include low versatility and the inability to determine actual size deviations. The use of these gauges in machine building is decreasing because of the introduction of universal measuring methods and mechanized and automatic devices.

M. A. PALEI

gauge

[gāj]
(electromagnetism)
One of the family of possible choices for the electric scalar potential and magnetic vector potential, given the electric and magnetic fields.

gauge, gage

1. The thickness of sheet metal or metal tubing, usually designated by a number.
2. The diameter of wire or a screw, usually designated by a number.
3. The distance between two points, such as parallel lines of connectors.
4. A strip of metal or wood used as a guide to control the thickness of a bituminous or concrete paving; called a screed when used in plastering.
5. A measuring instrument, esp. one for measuring liquid level, dimensions, or pressure.
7. In roofing, the length of a shingle, slate, or tile that is exposed when laid.
8. The quantity of gauging plaster used with common plaster (lime putty) to hasten its setting, etc.
9. To mix gauging plaster with lime putty, to effect better control of the set, to prevent shrinkage of the lime putty, and to increase its strength.
10. To cut, chip, or rub stone or brick to a uniform size or shape.

gauge

gauge
i. Any pressure, temperature, or flow-measuring instrument.
ii. A standard measure of sheet and wire thickness. The higher the number, the lesser the thickness.
iii. A hand comparator for a GO/NO GO check on an exact dimension or a screw thread.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of the experiment was to build a small size vacuum system in order to reach high vacuum and perform all manipulations needed for vacuum gauge verification using comparison method, gas flow, correction factor and to obtain the necessary data.
If you have a certified aircraft, you can't replace a gauge with an automotive model.
The price of the G-TRAN Series "Multi ionization Gauge SH2" combined vacuum gauge will be 120,000 yen for the SH2 Multi ionization gauge unit for measurements between the medium and high vacuum range, 180,000 yen for the SH2 and SPU Pirani gauge connection type that can measure from low to high vacuum range, and 230,000 yen for the type which includes the SH2, SPU and SAU pressure sensor that can measure from the atmospheric pressure to high vacuum range.
So, generator mechanics, why not check these gauges right now?
Aviation historians oppose that plan, saying the gauges and dials are vital to maintaining the thousands of World War II planes still in operation.
This is particularly true when these gauges are stem-mounted directly and liquid-filled, because the larger-size gauge socket will support the pressure gauge better.
The repeatability of a glass-enclosed gauge is affected by accumulated electrostatic charge on the glass wall due to electrons from the filament.
Armorers, the gauges must be calibrated every year by your local TMDE if they are to stay accurate.
It was shown for the first time running with a Kundig rotating thickness gauge.
The dampener lowers the gauge at the same rate for each test, resulting in superior repeatability, according to the company.
Today's shotgunner is faced with a lot more gauge choices than his predecessors.