gauge

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gauge

, gage
1. a standard measurement, dimension, capacity, or quantity
2. any of various instruments for measuring a quantity
3. any of various devices used to check for conformity with a standard measurement
4. the thickness of sheet metal or the diameter of wire
5. the distance between the rails of a railway track: in Britain 4 ft. 8½ in. (1.435 m)
6. the distance between two wheels on the same axle of a vehicle, truck, etc.
7. Nautical the position of a vessel in relation to the wind and another vessel. One vessel may be windward (weather gauge) or leeward (lee gauge) of the other
8. a measure of the fineness of woven or knitted fabric, usually expressed as the number of needles used per inch
9. the width of motion-picture film or magnetic tape
10. (of a pressure measurement) measured on a pressure gauge that registers zero at atmospheric pressure; above or below atmospheric pressure
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Gauge

To shape a brick by rubbing or molding it into a particular size.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gauge

 

a scaleless measuring device designed for checking the dimensions, shape, and relative positions of the parts of articles. The checking consists in a comparison of the dimensions of a product with a measuring gauge in terms of the fit or degree of contact of their surfaces. This comparison makes possible classification of products as acceptable (if the dimensions lie within tolerance limits), defective (with repair possible), or irreparable.

The most widely used limit (go-no go) gauges are go gauges, which are made according to the minimum limiting size of an opening or the maximum size of a shaft and fit into acceptable products, and no-go gauges, which are made for the maximum size of an opening or the minimum size of a shaft and will not fit into acceptable products. Gauges are also classified according to purposes: working gauges, used for testing products at the manufacturing plant; acceptance gauges, used by the consumer for rechecking products; and reference gauges, which are used for testing or regulation of working and acceptance gauges. The advantages of gauges are simplicity of design and the possibility of integrated checking of products of complex shape; disadvantages include low versatility and the inability to determine actual size deviations. The use of these gauges in machine building is decreasing because of the introduction of universal measuring methods and mechanized and automatic devices.

M. A. PALEI

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

gauge

[gāj]
(electromagnetism)
One of the family of possible choices for the electric scalar potential and magnetic vector potential, given the electric and magnetic fields.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gauge, gage

1. The thickness of sheet metal or metal tubing, usually designated by a number.
2. The diameter of wire or a screw, usually designated by a number.
3. The distance between two points, such as parallel lines of connectors.
4. A strip of metal or wood used as a guide to control the thickness of a bituminous or concrete paving; called a screed when used in plastering.
5. A measuring instrument, esp. one for measuring liquid level, dimensions, or pressure.
7. In roofing, the length of a shingle, slate, or tile that is exposed when laid.
8. The quantity of gauging plaster used with common plaster (lime putty) to hasten its setting, etc.
9. To mix gauging plaster with lime putty, to effect better control of the set, to prevent shrinkage of the lime putty, and to increase its strength.
10. To cut, chip, or rub stone or brick to a uniform size or shape.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gauge

gauge
i. Any pressure, temperature, or flow-measuring instrument.
ii. A standard measure of sheet and wire thickness. The higher the number, the lesser the thickness.
iii. A hand comparator for a GO/NO GO check on an exact dimension or a screw thread.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Main purpose of this paper is to present the new vacuum gauge verification methodology.
When it comes to repairing engine and system gauges, there are shops all around the country that have in-house capability.
Fixing or replacing that gauge is a key part of preventive maintenance.
Results: A total number of 200 cases were recruited in this study, out of which 100 were aspirated with 21 gauge needles and 100 with 22 gauge needles.
TEK Instrument Company is an online distributor of Instrumentation, Controls, and Gauges. Product categories include Infrared Thermometers, Digital Pressure Gauges, Digital Multimeters, Differential Pressure Gauges, Thermo Hygrometers, Digital Anemometers, Digital Differential Pressure Gauges, Transmitters, Clamp Meters, Insulation & Continuity Testers and many more test and measurement instruments.
For the best results and greatest accuracy, the unloaded firearm should be laid on a flat surface with the gauge put into use parallel to the firearm.
Complete range of industrial transducers and transmitters for monitoring gauge and absolute pressure, differential pressure, vacuum, load, weight, force, torque, displacement, and acceleration.
"The more memory a material has, the heavier gauge wire you need to utilize."
Higher temperatures cause gauges to show higher pressures.
The 3-inch magnum 12 gauge was loaded with 1 7/8 ounces of shot--nearly replicating the 10-gauge loads of the day and nearly killing off the larger bore.
* the physical placement of gauge identification numbers on the gauges themselves;