gauge

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gauge

, gage
1. a standard measurement, dimension, capacity, or quantity
2. any of various instruments for measuring a quantity
3. any of various devices used to check for conformity with a standard measurement
4. the thickness of sheet metal or the diameter of wire
5. the distance between the rails of a railway track: in Britain 4 ft. 8½ in. (1.435 m)
6. the distance between two wheels on the same axle of a vehicle, truck, etc.
7. Nautical the position of a vessel in relation to the wind and another vessel. One vessel may be windward (weather gauge) or leeward (lee gauge) of the other
8. a measure of the fineness of woven or knitted fabric, usually expressed as the number of needles used per inch
9. the width of motion-picture film or magnetic tape
10. (of a pressure measurement) measured on a pressure gauge that registers zero at atmospheric pressure; above or below atmospheric pressure

Gauge

To shape a brick by rubbing or molding it into a particular size.

Gauge

 

a scaleless measuring device designed for checking the dimensions, shape, and relative positions of the parts of articles. The checking consists in a comparison of the dimensions of a product with a measuring gauge in terms of the fit or degree of contact of their surfaces. This comparison makes possible classification of products as acceptable (if the dimensions lie within tolerance limits), defective (with repair possible), or irreparable.

The most widely used limit (go-no go) gauges are go gauges, which are made according to the minimum limiting size of an opening or the maximum size of a shaft and fit into acceptable products, and no-go gauges, which are made for the maximum size of an opening or the minimum size of a shaft and will not fit into acceptable products. Gauges are also classified according to purposes: working gauges, used for testing products at the manufacturing plant; acceptance gauges, used by the consumer for rechecking products; and reference gauges, which are used for testing or regulation of working and acceptance gauges. The advantages of gauges are simplicity of design and the possibility of integrated checking of products of complex shape; disadvantages include low versatility and the inability to determine actual size deviations. The use of these gauges in machine building is decreasing because of the introduction of universal measuring methods and mechanized and automatic devices.

M. A. PALEI

gauge

[gāj]
(electromagnetism)
One of the family of possible choices for the electric scalar potential and magnetic vector potential, given the electric and magnetic fields.

gauge, gage

1. The thickness of sheet metal or metal tubing, usually designated by a number.
2. The diameter of wire or a screw, usually designated by a number.
3. The distance between two points, such as parallel lines of connectors.
4. A strip of metal or wood used as a guide to control the thickness of a bituminous or concrete paving; called a screed when used in plastering.
5. A measuring instrument, esp. one for measuring liquid level, dimensions, or pressure.
7. In roofing, the length of a shingle, slate, or tile that is exposed when laid.
8. The quantity of gauging plaster used with common plaster (lime putty) to hasten its setting, etc.
9. To mix gauging plaster with lime putty, to effect better control of the set, to prevent shrinkage of the lime putty, and to increase its strength.
10. To cut, chip, or rub stone or brick to a uniform size or shape.

gauge

gauge
i. Any pressure, temperature, or flow-measuring instrument.
ii. A standard measure of sheet and wire thickness. The higher the number, the lesser the thickness.
iii. A hand comparator for a GO/NO GO check on an exact dimension or a screw thread.
References in periodicals archive ?
Capacitance gauges create an electric field that passes at an angle through the film, and they mathematically interpret the field strength as a measure of the film's relative thickness.
During manufacturing calibrated vacuum gauges are being used to ensure all necessary product characteristics and quality.
While individual gauges are somewhat easier to service, cluster gauges require some thinking.
Methodology: This was a prospective study of 200 cases in which FNAC was performed with either 21 or 22 gauge needles (100 cases with 21 gauge and 100 with 22 gauge needles).
However, this kind of conventional combined vacuum gauge has certain problems including, (1) the entire gauge head has to be replaced if one of the gauge heads failed, (2) the gauge heads are more complicated and break easily, (3) the gauge heads are expensive.
TEK Instrument Company is an online distributor of Instrumentation, Controls, and Gauges.
Chances are good that by now, the gauges with the black insulation are out of the supply system and when you order a new gauge, you'll get the white insulator.
The Plus Performance option is also available on Ashcroft's Type 1032 sanitary gauge, Type 1009 Duralife pressure gauge, Type 1008S stainless-steel metric case gauge and the Type 2279 Duratrain pressure transmitter gauge.
Complete range of industrial transducers and transmitters for monitoring gauge and absolute pressure, differential pressure, vacuum, load, weight, force, torque, displacement, and acceleration.
Though environmental regulators have known about the radioactive gauges at Preservation Aviation since the 1990s, EPA staffers were surprised by the high readings and immediately began moving the boxes of radioactive gauges away from the fence line to lower the levels near the sidewalk.
The more memory a material has, the heavier gauge wire you need to utilize.
To help prevent these problems, pressure gauges are often filled with a dampening fluid such as glycerin.