gelatin


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

gelatin

or

animal jelly,

foodstuff obtained from connective tissue (found in hoofs, bones, tendons, ligaments, and cartilage) of vertebrate animals by the action of boiling water or dilute acid. It is largely composed of denatured collagencollagen
, any of a group of proteins found in skin, ligaments, tendons, bone and cartilage, and other connective tissue. Cells called fibroblasts form the various fibers in connective tissue in the body.
..... Click the link for more information.
, a protein particularly rich in the amino acids proline and hydroxyproline. The process of manufacture is a complex one that involves removing foreign substances, boiling the material (usually in distilled water in aluminum vessels to prevent contamination), and purifying it of all chemicals used in freeing the gelatin from the connective tissues. The final product in its purest form is brittle, transparent, colorless, tasteless, and odorless and has the distinguishing property of dissolving in hot water and congealing when cold. In contact with cold water it takes up from 5 to 10 times its own weight and swells to an elastic, transparent mass. Gelatin, being readily digested and absorbed, is a good food for children and invalids. It is important in fine cookery as a vehicle for other materials, in the form of jellied soups, molded meats and salads, and frozen desserts. Preparations of it are used in the home manufacture of jam, jellies, and preserves to ensure jellification of fruit juices. It is used in the drying and preserving of fruits and meats, in the glazing of coffee, and in the preparation of powdered milk and other powdered foods. Bakeries use it in making meringues, eclairs, and other delicacies. In confectionery making it is used as the basis of taffy, nougat, marshmallows, and fondant. Ice cream manufacture employs it to maintain a permanent emulsion of other ingredients and thus to give body to the finished product. In scientific processes gelatin is widely employed, being used in electrotyping, photography, waterproofing, and dyeing, and in coating microscopic slides. It is used as a culture medium for bacteriological research and also to make coatings for pills and capsules, for court plaster, and for some surgical dressings. It affords a base for ointments and pastes, such as toothpaste; it is an emulsifying agent useful in making liquid combinations and various sprays. In its less pure forms gelatin is known as glue and size. Vegetable gelatin, or agaragar
, product obtained from several species of red algae, or seaweed, chiefly from the Ceylon, or Jaffna, moss (Gracilaria lichenoides) and species of Gelidium, harvested in eastern Asia and California.
..... Click the link for more information.
, is derived from East Indian seaweeds.

Gelatin

 

(gelatine), a mixture of protein substances of animal origin.

Gelatin is prepared from bones, tendons, and cartilage by prolonged boiling in water. In this process collagen, a component of connective tissue, becomes gluten. The resulting solution is evaporated, clarified, and chilled until it is converted to a gel, which is cut in pieces and dried. Gelatin is produced in sheet or powdered form. Finished dry gelatin is tasteless, odorless, transparent, and almost colorless or slightly yellow. It swells greatly in cold water and dilute acids, but does not dissolve. Upon heating, the swollen gelatin dissolves, forming a sticky solution that hardens to a gel. It is used in medicine and biology (as styptic or nutrient media), in pharmacy (the manufacture of capsules, suppositories, and so forth), in the food industry (production of gelatin, jelly, marmalade, and other confectionery products), in photography and cinematography (preparation of emulsions in the light-sensitive layer of cinema film, photographic paper, and X-ray film), and in industry (the sizing of high-grade paper; the manufacture of paper money, paints, artificial pearls, and other goods).

gelatin

[′jel·ət·ən]
(materials)
(organic chemistry)
A protein derived from the skin, white connective tissue, and bones of animals; used as a food and in photography, the plastics industry, metallurgy, and pharmaceuticals.

gelatine

, gelatin
1. a colourless or yellowish water-soluble protein prepared by boiling animal hides and bones: used in foods, glue, photographic emulsions, etc.
2. any of various substances that resemble gelatine
3. a translucent substance used for colour effects in theatrical lighting
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the proportion of patients requiring allogeneic transfusion after receiving gelatin solutions was not significantly different from patients who had received other types of intravenous fluids when all strata of different alternative fluids were pooled together (OR 1.
We have started trial production of gelatin from fish scales.
The high crystallinity of chitosan (23) and the rigidity of gelatin due to hydrogen bonding lead to their poor solubility (in most common organic solvents) and electro-spinnibility.
Star-K also told us their position on the use of gelatin (a meat product) in yogurt (a dairy product).
The idea of improving fish-skin gelatin with lysozyme is good but requires more study," Bower says.
With all the water a gel test calls for, if you trap it under boards, you'll magnify the effect of the bullet on the gelatin, giving misleading results.
This chapter explores how stabilizers such as starch and gelatin work, each giving desserts a specific texture, taste, and appearance.
Side by side, 2gm of gelatin was soaked for 10 minutes in 25ml water and later heated at 100[degrees]c till it formed a semi-viscous solution.
Give your bar graph a title ("The Effect of Gelatin Flavor on Melting Time").
The patient said that he eats scrambled eggs regularly, eats gelatin occasionally, and since receiving the flu shot, has eaten both foods without experiencing a reaction.
If the developer is too hot it can melt the gelatin holding the silver halides on your film.
According to Gary Brunet, president of Vyse Gelatin Company, the expanding partnership with Ashland allows Vyse to further leverage its gelatin expertise through Ashland's leading national distribution network.