geminate

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geminate

[′jem·ə·nət]
(biology)
Growing in pairs or couples.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kiparsky's (2006) analysis of Livonian, which historically underwent lengthening processes similar to those found in disyllabic Ingrian words (Kettunen 1938), the various gemination processes in Ingrian may be viewed as a strategy to improve the structure of the trochaic (strong-weak) feet characteristically employed by Finnic languages.
Kiparsky's account of Livonian differs, however, from other analyses in the foot structure that he assumes to be the final output of gemination. Whereas it is traditionally assumed that the feet resulting from gemination are trochees consisting of two heavy syllables, P.
The predictions about stress cannot readily be tested for Livonian since the etymological long vowels triggering gemination later reduced quantitatively and qualitatively to schwa.
* Is primary gemination associated with greater phonetic duration than other lengthening phenomena, i.e.
The gemination of the [g:] in English is attributable to the fact that it occurs in the stressed syllable.
There is considerable variation from speaker to speaker, and gemination is more likely to be encountered in more formal situations, public speaking, or as an affectation.
It would be mnemonically convenient if the negative prefixes ill-, imm-, inn-, and irr- all admitted of gemination in speech, while their nonnegative counterparts did not--but unfortunately this is not the case.
A number of other words, with medial orthographic doubling, may also trigger gemination. The following are some of the more commonly encountered examples.