gene flow


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gene flow

[′jēn ‚flō]
(genetics)
The passage and establishment of alleles characteristic of one breeding population into the gene pool of another population through hybridization and backcrossing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our results shed new light on the ways in which gene flow reshaped European populations throughout the Neolithic period.
Aerial Dispersal of Pollen and Spores" will hold notable importance for: Researchers and practitioners to evaluate the relative importance of nearby and faraway sources of inoculum: Breeders to assess outcrossing potential and pollen mediated gene flow (PMGF) in the environment; Botanists to evaluate physical characteristics of pollen and spores.
These results are generally consistent with the idea that limited passive dispersal severely restricts gene flow among distant populations.
One of the most important examples of gene flow between crop and weed occurs with the natural mutant rice tolerant to imidazolinones herbicides (Clearfield[R]) to weedy red rice.
Past studies have maintained that gene flow between both social forms is through monogyne males mating with polygyne female alates (Ross 1992; Shoemaker & Ross 1996; Ross et al.
The two subspecies whose ranges meet at the terminal ends of the ring--considered to be the two subspecies that have diverged phenotypically to the greatest extent--are reproductively isolated but other subspecies continue to be connected via gene flow (Fig.
Monomorphism in amplification profile of the same species belonging to different areas shows gene flow among mosquito populations (Ayres et al.
39% existed among populations, which indicated low level of genetic differentiation among populations and high level of gene flow between populations.
Key words: Alaska, genetic diversity, gene flow, moose, population genetic structure
Vertical gene flow is a major ecological concern where transgenic crops are under cultivation.
Key elements of that research program (Butlin et al, 2012) include analyses of (1) the targets of selection acting on diverging lineages of organisms as they adapt to different environments or habitats, and (2) the barriers to gene flow between lineages that would otherwise oppose their divergence under selection for phenotypic differences.
Some consequences of habitat fragmentation, such as reduced population sizes, increased distance between populations, and altered habitat conditions can affect seed production and gene flow of plants (Nason and Hamrick, 1997; Lienert, 2004).