gene flow


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gene flow

[′jēn ‚flō]
(genetics)
The passage and establishment of alleles characteristic of one breeding population into the gene pool of another population through hybridization and backcrossing.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
To address these questions, and determine whether the ETP comprises one large, panmictic population with high demographic connectivity, or whether gene flow is low along this coastline and populations demographically distinct, we use microsatellite and mtDNA markers to characterize genetic structure and estimate migration rates.
To clarify the population sub-structure and gene flow in Brachypelma vagans, we then evaluated three genetic fragments for their ability to distinguish individuals from two populations in Belize.
The genetic variation of a species can be impacted by its reproductive biology (Wong and Sun, 1999), population size (Goodell et al., 1997), and proximity of populations to one another that affects gene flow (Fore and Guttman, 1999; Morris, 1993).
The presence of a pelagic larva may influence the characteristics of population structure, based on the impact of these stages on the capacity for dispersion of these species (gene flow) (Hunt 1993, Williams & Benzie 1993, Ayre et al.
Based on both genetic diversity and gene flow estimates, they concluded that the atomic blast sites act as ecological sinks.
Gene flow can be expected to occur in many crop-weed complexes in cases where the crop and the weed have sympatric ranges, are sexually compatible, have overlapping flowering times, and share a common pollination mechanism.
The gene flow metric separates co-existing microbes in genetically and ecologically distinct populations, Martin Polz, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at MIT, and colleagues write in the August 8 issue of Cell.
More so than other crops, gene flow from cultivated, addictive, social-drug plants may have unintended biosafety consequences, given their dramatic effects on vertebrate physiology (e.g., Ankley et al., 2007; Nutt et al., 2010, and later references).
Gene flow may ameliorate the negative effects of habitat loss and isolation by increasing effective population size and introducing novel alleles into fragments (White, Boshier, & Powell, 2002), thus reducing the detrimental effects of drift (Ellstrand & Elam, 1993; Couvet, 2002).
Gene flow (Nm: 3.246+-0.448) and genetic similarity (97-98%) between populations was high.