genetic map

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genetic map

[jə¦ned·ik ′map]
(genetics)
A graphic presentation of the linear arrangement of genes on a chromosome; gene positions are determined by percentages of recombination in linkage experiments. Also known as chromosome map.
References in periodicals archive ?
The real impact of gene mapping in clinical care is yet to be seen in mainstream health care.
In addition, the knowledge of gene mapping may be used for the design of new therapeutics, including gene therapy, based on DNA sequence information.
Other applications for restriction enzymes include DNA sequencing, gene mapping, gene therapeutics, forensics, PCR and routine DNA analysis.
Linkage Map Construction, Map Merging, and Gene Mapping of the [Ms.
High-density gene mapping and examination of functional pathways and genomic structures are the best ways to identify genetic susceptibilities to lethal arrhythmias.
The researchers, who included gene mapping pioneer Dr Craig Venter, used a male standard poodle as their DNA source.
Experts believe these 'next generation' scientists will be vital to making sense of complex computer data tied to gene mapping and understanding how healthy cells become diseased.
The topics can be put loosely into five categories: gene mapping (including discovery, identification, and localization), expression profiling, protein structure and function, gene therapy, and bioinformatics.
With the ever-increasing developments in genetics and gene mapping, Sir William says these are exciting times for the company.
RECENT developments in the biological sciences, including genomics, the science of gene mapping and manipulation, have the potential to change human life in ways that make the industrial revolution look like a Sunday school picnic.
Now we can use either marker-assisted selection to integrate those genes into breeding nucleuses to create less aggressive hogs, or we can clone the genes by using fine gene mapping techniques," Muir says.
While the first edition tried to cover as many areas of the in situ hybridization (ISH) technique as possible, the goals of the second are to describe research methods for gene mapping and localization of messenger RNA expression in tissues.