gene scanning

gene scanning

[¦jēn ‚skan·iŋ]
(cell and molecular biology)
A method by which mutations are inserted at specific sites on a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) segment to determine those DNA sequences needed for gene activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Genome uses gene scanning to detect changes in the genes, chromosomes and proteins that can lead to genetic diseases, allowing researchers to prevent and eradicate chronic diseases and cancer.
It perfects gene scanning to detect changes in the genes, chromosomes, and proteins that can lead to genetic diseases, allowing researchers to prevent and eradicate chronic diseases and cancer, and reduce the financial burden for treating chronic diseases, in addition to slowing down the aging process.
Gene scanning and genotyping with snapback primers requires only 2 primers, symmetric PCR with a saturation dye, and high-resolution melting.
The more useful information that gene scanning can provide today is how we will likely react to various pharmaceuticals.
With support from the National Institutes of Health, researchers found those mutations through whole exome sequencing -- a new gene scanning technology that cuts the cost and time of searching for rare mutations.
Duncan Odom, project researcher adds, "We developed an efficient gene scanning technology so we could map genome binding sites for many transcription factors in a human organ.
This analysis method improves the resolution, through-put and ease of high resolution nucleic acid melting techniques and broadens its appeal for expanded use in gene scanning, mutation discovery, and genotyping applications.
Genome' uses gene scanning to detect changes in the genes, chromosomes, and proteins that can lead to genetic diseases, allowing researchers to prevent and eradicate chronic diseases and cancer.
The apparatus for conducting PCR in real time using different fluorescent dyes allows to perform quantitative analyzes (absolute and relative ) and mutation analysis (HRM / Gene Scanning, end-point, the verification of genotype based on the melting curve).
Because gene scanning depends on melting curve differences created by mismatched bases, it is not always feasible to detect homozygous mutations when a gene-scanning protocol is used.
As the new gene scanning software module was only recently made available on the LightCycler 480, we were able to find data from only one other study (9) comparing the results of both instruments for factor VIII mutations.
Recently, high-resolution melting analysis was introduced as a simple, closed-tube, gene scanning technique (13).