gene splicing


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Related to gene splicing: genetic engineering

gene splicing

[′jēn ‚splīs·iŋ]
References in periodicals archive ?
Impairment of IGF-I gene splicing and MGF expression associated with muscle wasting.
The FDA, USDA, and EPA, regulators of gene-splicing technology, all say yes, gene splicing does bring with it novel risks and have devised separate regulatory rules for gene-spliced vs.
Nevertheless, regulations in the United States and abroad, which apply only to the products of gene splicing, have hugely inflated R & D costs and made it difficult to apply the technology to many classes of agricultural products, especially ones with low profit potential, such as noncommodity crops and varieties grown by subsistence farmers.
It seems likely that within my daughter's lifetime, if not my own, we will be able to clone ourselves, create hybrid organisms through gene splicing, incorporate silicon chips in our brains, interface machinery directly with our nervous systems, and reset our neurotransmitter and hormone levels at will.
He writes: "Within the context of real and potential risks involved with gene splicing there is "a certitude arising from probabilities, that, as time passes, the process itself can be deemed safe."
It is possible that the Plasmodium parasite would mutate to evade the genetic obstacle in its path, necessitating a whole new round of gene splicing while the old gene continued to spread in the wild without public health benefit.
This is because of the haphazard nature of gene splicing. Scientists cannot tell whether they have successfully Spliced a foreign protein into a common food unless they also insert an antibiotic-resistant marker gene.
Its major report, "Splicing Life," was released in 1982 and did not find in the gene splicing being planned or undertaken the "fundamental danger" to human values, social norms, or ethical principles that alarmed the religious leaders.
This led to the discovery of a process called gene splicing - which scientists believe speeds up the evolution of man.
It is one of the initial and most critical stages of what is commonly known as gene splicing. Eventually, Uehara will be isolating a gene from a luminescent squid called vibrio fisheri and then transfer it into an e.
Louis Priybl of the FDA Microbiology Group, "There is a profound difference between the types of unexpected effects from traditional breeding and genetic engineering which is just glanced over in this document." He added that several aspects of gene splicing "...may be more hazardous."