gene suppression


Also found in: Medical.

gene suppression

[′jēn sə‚presh·ən]
(genetics)
The development of a normal phenotype in a mutant individual or cell due to a second mutation either in the same gene or in a different gene.
References in periodicals archive ?
This result confirms the inhibitory effect of siRNAs designed in this study as the main function of Th17 cells, that is IL-17 expression, was blocked after RORC2 gene suppression.
The hypothesis was that the gene suppression would act like a clogged pipe, creating an abundance of compounds that would have later become phenylalanine in a normal plant.But that's not what happened."These plants knew that the last step of phenylalanine production was down and slowed the first steps," Dudareva said.Maeda said the plant created some sort of feedback mechanism that slowed down the entry point of the shikimate pathway.Dudareva and Maeda wanted to see what would happen if they forced the shikimate pathway to function, so they gave the petunias shikimic acid.
This knowledge allows scientists to explore gene suppression, a possible key to unlocking a cure for dozens of diseases, he said.
Riggs in 1983 theorized that the X, compared with other chromosomes, is enriched in some DNA sequence that facilitates gene suppression. The two called this putative piece of DNA a "way station" or "booster element" because it would help inactivation spread across the X chromosome.
Second generation tomatoes are being developed through a recombinant DNA technique using a patented gene suppression method.