general relativity


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Related to general relativity: general relativity theory

general relativity

See relativity, general theory.

general relativity

[¦jen·rəl ‚rel·ə′tiv·əd·ē]
(relativity)
The theory of Einstein which generalizes special relativity to noninertial frames of reference and incorporates gravitation, and in which events take place in a curved space.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ghez, however, said General Relativity is definitely showing vulnerability since it can't fully explain gravity inside a black hole.
"That's what gives us the entry ticket into the tests of general relativity. We asked how gravity behaves near a supermassive black hole and whether Einstein's theory is telling us the full story.
The General Relativity Theory also predicted the existence of gravitational waves.
Einstein, Hilbert, and The Theory of Gravitation, Historical Origins of General Relativity Theory, Springer, 1974.
In his theory of general relativity, Einstein predicted the extent to which light curves.
General relativity was not just the last of Einstein's truly magnificent ideas, but arguably the greatest of them.
This geometric way of thinking about the Universe is, as we shall see, essential for understanding general relativity.
The Laws that governs Quantum Mechanics applies to Cosmology or General Relativity as one mirrors the other or one compliments the other.
She begins with a very lucid separation of the topic into Special and General Relativity. The distinction lies with ignoring the effects of gravity and acceleration in special relativity.
We can simply only consider the force exerted by the earth, according to the General Relativity, the time and space around the earth becomes winding.
Ten years later, working in Zurich but also in Berlin, he incorporated the effects of masses and developed the theory of general relativity. The reaction in the scientific community was both a burst of experimental activity testing these theories' predictions and a backlash of skepticism and confusion.

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