General Theory of Relativity


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Related to General Theory of Relativity: special theory of relativity
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

General Theory of Relativity

 

a contemporary physical theory of space, time, and gravitation. The general theory of relativity was finally formulated by A. Einstein in 1916 and is based on the experimental fact that the inertial mass, which enters in Newton’s second law of motion, and the gravitational mass, which enters in the law of gravitation, are the same for any body. This fact leads to the principle of equivalence. The equality of the inertial mass and the gravitational mass is manifested by the lack of dependence of the motion of a body in a gravitational field on the mass of the body. This enables the general theory of relativity to be used to interpret gravitation as the curvature of the space-time continuum. The general theory of relativity is thus a theory of gravitation constructed on the basis of relativity theory.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
That's what happened when physicists starting in the 1930s discovered quantum mechanics, which challenged Einstein's general theory of relativity, and which eventually morphed into string theory in the 1980s (and yes, I'm simplifying here), which harmonized general relativity and quantum mechanics.
Because [Albert] Einstein's general theory of relativity does not choose a time orientation, if a black hole can form from the gravitational collapse of matter through an event horizon in the future, then the reverse process is also possible.
Under some conditions, the aftermath is actually visible, and he draws on the general theory of relativity to explain how these visible ultra-dense regions arise naturally and generically as the outcome of a dynamical gravitational collapse in Einstein gravity.
Also worth a re-showing is Chris Gollon's painting, Einstein and the Jealous Monk, acquired by the gallery in 2005 in celebration of Einstein Year and the centenary of the General Theory of Relativity.
The waves predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity are seen as the holy grail of physics.
Nevertheless, Einstein's initial insights, built upon the work of earlier scientists (notably Lorentz and Poincare), are taken as the beginning of modern cosmology, for, eleven years after the publication of his initial papers, his special theory of relativity would lead to the full formulation of his general theory of relativity, and his initial insights into the nature of matter and radiation--built especially upon the work of Max Planck, who asserted in 1900 that energy of radiation is produced in discrete little bundles, in direct proportion to the radiation's frequency (the famous E=hv equation)--would lead Bohr, Heisenberg, Schrodinger, Dirac, and Fynmann to work out the Quantum Theory, which in turn would change our perception of the physical world.
Einstein: Nobel Prize winner in physics, Time magazine's "Person of the [Twentieth] Century," the scientist whose formula E=M[C.sup.2] and General Theory of Relativity led to monumental scientific advances.
He went on to a brilliant career that included at least one other epochal paper, his 1916 discussion of gravitational fields in "The Foundation of the General Theory of Relativity." When Hitler and the Nazis came to power in Germany in 1933, Einstein emigrated to the United States, where he joined the newly formed Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton.
whose General Theory of Relativity looms large in this book, spent the last decades of his life trying to find a unified theory of physics, one that would unite everything we know about matter and energy, from the smallest particles to the cosmos on its grandest scale.
Among the documents posted online is a notebook in which he worked out his general theory of relativity, which explained gravity as the warping of space-time geometry and is generally regarded as his greatest achievement.
"It showed that the universe must have begun with a singularity, if Einstein's general theory of relativity is correct.
This teaching guide introduces a relativity gyroscope experiment aiming to test two unverified predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. An introduction to the theory includes the following sections: (1) "Spacetime, Curved Spacetime, and Frame-Dragging"; (2) "'Seeing' Spacetime with Gyroscopes"; (3) "The Gravity Probe B Science Instrument"; and (4) "Concluding Questions of Gravity Probe B." The guide also presents seven classroom extension activities and demonstrations.

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