genetic equilibrium


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genetic equilibrium

[jə¦ned·ik ‚ē·kwə′lib·rē·əm]
(genetics)
In a population, the condition in which the frequencies of allelic genes are maintained at the same values from generation to generation.
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According to genetic equilibrium theory, because inbreeding increases with generations, increasing the generation interval and size of breeding populations are essential to the preservation of existing gene pools [4], and thus a random mating system can reduce drift [5,6].
It has been shown that studied population of the Polish Black-and-White Holstein-Friesian cattle reach the genetic equilibrium (Table I).
Moreover, rs113481894 locus genotype frequency distributions all followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (PHRS group=0.98, Pcontrol group=0.542), indicating that gene frequencies of this locus had reached genetic equilibrium and it was group-representative.
On islands closer to the mainland and smaller in size, in contrast, genetic equilibrium will attain sooner, without any signs of phenotypic changes (Kneiss Island).
In milk-producing cattle when milk protein genes are in genetic equilibrium it is an indicator of the absence of selection processes (Gouda et al.
Specifically, is there evidence for "mating trials" between what have become full siblings, and, if so, are the various combinations of sex chromosome types in genetic equilibrium suggesting an incipient speciation event?
- to encourage development of national policies to ensure sustainable utilisation and conservation of tropical forests and to protect genetic equilibrium in the relevant regions.
Use of this equation assumes that populations are in equilibrium between mutation, migration, and gene flow: if populations are in genetic equilibrium, then population structure is a reflection of current levels of gene flow and genetic drift; if populations are not in equilibrium, then estimates likely reflect historic conditions.
While classical isolation-by-distance models suggest that gene flow between these populations is low enough to allow divergence under conditions of genetic equilibrium, there has not been enough time since the last sea-level rise for a homogeneous stock to have differentiated without strong selection.
The populations were under genetic equilibrium and their genetic variations were mainly under the control of within-population variation.
This is evidence of disturbed genetic equilibrium in relation to MC4R/Ncol genotypes within the study population.