genetic isolation


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genetic isolation

[jə¦ned·ik īs·əl′ā·shən]
(genetics)
The absence of genetic exchange between populations or species as a result of geographic separation or of mechanisms that prevent reproduction.
References in periodicals archive ?
These low values of Gst and higher values of Rst are indicative of a higher gene flow between populations, and thus a lower level of genetic isolation between populations.
[F.sub.ST] was estimated to be 0.596 (95% CI 0.573-0.649), indicating genetic isolation among regions and also supporting the rationale for classifying the HPAI (H5N1) virus hemagglutinin sequences into 9 regions (24).
Although they reported the presence of 3 distinct genetic populations along their northern coasts, their study was likely confounded by small sample sizes, lack of a temporal sampling design, and no corrections for multiple comparisons in their analyses as they were unable to identify any potential behavioral or geographic mechanisms of genetic isolation among detected groupings.
Known genetic information suggests that even small spatial distances of 2-5 km show genetic isolation (Chapter 9).
In this context, the genetic differentiation found between quetzals subspecies supports a genetic isolation larger than 4N generations.
This plant-pollinator monogamy maintains genetic isolation and prevents undesirable pollen from clogging up the works.
Although the co-habitation of all reproductives does not suggest nest budding in this case, genetic isolation of a subset of workers that maintain constant contact with less genetically differentiated individuals lends support to the hypothesis that physical or functional budding can occur without complete isolation from nestmates (Thorne et al.
During farming, the report warns, "low levels of gene flow will occur at long distances and thus complete genetic isolation will be difficult to maintain," leading to the creation of plants with accumulated genetic traits from different GM varieties.
It can not travel between stands of trees isolated by clearcuts, so populations are prone to genetic isolation.
They envision these engineered hybrids living in a kind of genetic isolation, walled off from the larger biotic community.
Swanson's initial DNA analysis revealed a high degree of genetic isolation in the mountain foxes: Few of the high-elevation foxes dispersed among and interbred with those individuals below.
Each of the five populations with fish presented in increasing order of geographic and genetic isolation from fishless populations.