genetic isolation


Also found in: Medical.

genetic isolation

[jə¦ned·ik īs·əl′ā·shən]
(genetics)
The absence of genetic exchange between populations or species as a result of geographic separation or of mechanisms that prevent reproduction.
References in periodicals archive ?
649), indicating genetic isolation among regions and also supporting the rationale for classifying the HPAI (H5N1) virus hemagglutinin sequences into 9 regions (24).
As predicted, greater isolation of bobcat habitat in the Orange County region was associated with greater genetic isolation, particularly during our first sampling period.
In this context, the genetic differentiation found between quetzals subspecies supports a genetic isolation larger than 4N generations.
During farming, the report warns, "low levels of gene flow will occur at long distances and thus complete genetic isolation will be difficult to maintain," leading to the creation of plants with accumulated genetic traits from different GM varieties.
Oil seed rape presents a high risk of contaminating similar crops and wild plants and complete genetic isolation "will be difficult to maintain" when it is grown in fields.
They envision these engineered hybrids living in a kind of genetic isolation, walled off from the larger biotic community.
Swanson's initial DNA analysis revealed a high degree of genetic isolation in the mountain foxes: Few of the high-elevation foxes dispersed among and interbred with those individuals below.
Each of the five populations with fish presented in increasing order of geographic and genetic isolation from fishless populations.
Perhaps if genetic isolation had been more prevalent there would have been stronger reasons.
In rejecting petitions to list northern goshawks, FWS bluntly asserted that "the burden of proof for genetic isolation rests with the petitioner .
An Amway Corporation advert in a recent edition of Life magazine discussed the plight of the Florida panther, observing that "Prolonged genetic isolation has resulted in high kitten mortality (and) odd fur cow licks on their backs and deformed tails.
These measures have two aims: to increase favourable habitats for wild bees; and to reduce the genetic isolation of individual populations.