genetic material


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genetic material

[jə¦ned·ik mə′tir·ē·əl]
(genetics)
The nuclear (chromosomal) and cytoplasmic (mitochondrial and chloroplast) material that plays a fundamental role in determining the nature of all cell substances, cell structures, and cell effects; the genes have properties of self-propagation and variation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers say that they have identified the location of genetic material responsible for the production of nNOS, a molecular compound that produces nitric oxide and is vital to curing the disease.
Lo notes that this genetic material seems to make its way into maternal blood when placental cells die, rupture, and spill their contents into the mother's bloodstream.
Wilmut announced that he had replaced the genetic material of a sheep's egg with the DNA from an adult sheep and created a lamb that is a clone of the adult.
The test, called DNA fingerprinting--which looks at the genetic material that makes each of us unique--may provide the evidence that sets O.
The genetic material decoded is of a 52- year- old healthy man.
In all cases, the genetic material came from mitochondria, energy-producing cell structures, rather than from a cell's nucleus.
The discovery could help scientists understand how immune-system cells prune their own genetic material to give the body immunity to many foreign substances.
The debate centers on the fact that milk from these drug-treated cows is the first food produced by genetic engineering, the transfer of genetic material from one kind of living thing, or species, to another.
Studies of DNA in cells' nuclei will prove critical, although it's difficult to extract this genetic material from fossils he notes.
The scientists also took samples of the participants' blood, from which genetic material was extracted.
By priming embryonic cells with genetic material derived from people with problems that stem cells may one day treat, researchers have isolated 11 new lines of stem cells that exactly match the patients' own DNA.
They named it ``fusin'' because it helps the coat of the virus to fuse with the cell's outer membrane and inject its genetic material into the cell.