condyloma acuminata

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condyloma acuminata

[‚kän·də′lō·mə ə‚kyü·mə′näd·ə]
(medicine)
A venereal disease characterized by wartlike growths on the genital organs; thought to be of viral origin.
References in periodicals archive ?
About a hundred accepting consecutive patients clinically diagnosed with genital warts were interviewed regarding the demographic features including age, sex, religion, occupation, educational status, marital status and others.
We also found an almost significant association between psychoticism and genital wart. These results are in line with previous studies.
Methods: One hundred ten patients with genital warts who were treated in our hospital from June 2013 to October 2014 were selected.
[4] The number of viral STDs, particularly genital warts have been rising consistently, probably due to increasing usage of antibiotics for treatment of bacterial STDs.
Other health problems can result from HPV infection as well, including: genital warts; recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP), a rare condition where warts grow in the throat; and other less common but potentially serious cancers, including cancer of the vulva, vagina and penis, and oropharyngeal cancer, a type of head and neck cancer that affects the back of the throat, base of the tongue and the tonsils.
Genital warts aren't life threatening, but they can be life altering.
The aim of this study was to examine the influence of genital warts on the quality of life of infected women and their psychological state by using standardized instruments for measuring the quality of life.
Moreover, some cases of genital warts might be associated with dysplasia or carry the risk of future transformation into intraepithelial carcinomas (12), and it should be noted that BuschkeLowenstein tumors, with invasive growth, recurrence, and possible malignant transformation, are always preceded by condyloma acuminatum (13).
Genital warts (condylomata acuminate) is one of the most common types of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and usually these warts appear in various places such as the genital area, the rectum, the mucous membranes of the rectum, the cervix, and on the Miss V and the disease is highly contagious.
The appearance of the genital and perianal lesions was consistent with condylomata lata--a cutaneous sign of secondary syphilis--rather than genital warts. The presence of a rash on the patient's trunk and extremities further supported this diagnosis.
The overall rate of genital warts was 1.97/1,000 person-years.