genome


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to genome: Human genome, Genome sequencing

genome:

see geneticsgenetics,
scientific study of the mechanism of heredity. While Gregor Mendel first presented his findings on the statistical laws governing the transmission of certain traits from generation to generation in 1856, it was not until the discovery and detailed study of the
..... Click the link for more information.
.

genome

the overall genetic constitution of an organism/species as constituted by the chromosomal makeup of every member (the term arises from a combination of the terms ‘gene’ and ‘chromosome’). See also GENETICS, HUMAN GENOME PROJECT.

Genome

 

a haploid chromosome set; the sum total of the genes localized in the individual set of chromosomes of a given organism. The term was introduced in 1920 by the German biologist H. Winkler. The genome is usually understood to mean the sum of the genes concentrated in the chromosomes, without taking into account the hereditary determinants connected with the structures of cytoplasm. In the gametes of diploid organisms, as well as in the cells of haploid organisms, there is one genome; in the somatic cells of diploid organisms there are two genomes. With an increase in ploidy of the cells, the number of genomes grows. In fertilization, the genomes of the paternal and maternal gametes unite. As a rule, genomes obtained from paternal and maternal gametes are homologous. Homology between all or some genomes exists in all but distant hybrids. Absolute homology of two genomes may be defined as the coinciding of the linear arrangement of the genes in every chromosome. This coinciding ensures the possibility of the normal conjugation of chromosomes in meiosis.

Changes in the number of chromosomes (for example, polyploidy or an increase or loss of individual chromosomes) are called genomic mutations. An organism in which one and the same genome is repeated several times is called au-topolyploid. An organism in which different genomes are combined is called allopolyploid. Wheats may serve as an example of the allopolyploids. The haploid number of chromosomes in hard wheat is 14, in soft wheat, 21; and in einkorn, seven. By hybridization and the study of the conjugation of chromosomes in meiosis, it was ascertained that in all wheats there is one common genome (genome A) made up of seven chromosomes. In hard and soft wheat there are two common genomes (genomes A, B), each having seven chromosomes. Finally, in soft wheat, there is still another special genome (genome D), also made up of seven chromosomes. Thus, the genomic formula for einkorn is AA and for hard wheat it is AABB. Soft wheat, which has arisen in the process of evolution by the crossing of three different wild cereals and by the doubling of the number of chromosomes in the hybrids, has the genomic formula AABBDD.

In the experiments of the Soviet geneticist G. D. Kar-pechenko, radish and cabbage genomes were combined for the first time in a hybrid organism. By means of corresponding crossings and cytological analysis, the origin of separate genomes can be established. For example, V. A. Rybin obtained (resynthesized) a cultivated plum by crossing the cherry plum and the sloe; thus it was established that the genome of a plum includes cherry plum and sloe genomes. Of great significance in understanding the structure and functioning of the genome have been the establishment of the structure of the molecules of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and of the mechanisms of their replication, and the establishment of the means of “tracing” and transmitting genetic information.

V. N. SOIFER and V. V. KHVOSTOVA

genome

[′jē‚nōm]
(genetics)
The genetic endowment of a species.
The haploid set of chromosomes.

genome

, genom
1. the full complement of genetic material within an organism
2. all the genes comprising a haploid set of chromosomes
References in periodicals archive ?
More than 40 other analyses also appeared in journals including Science, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Genome Research.
Chapter 6 enters into the African-American perspective on the Human Genome Project and the American medical system's history of racism.
Because recombination along the chromosomes is averaged over the genetic history of the population at large, this should randomize any association between a given polymorphism and phenotype, or environmental influence, unless it is closely linked with specific alleles in the genome.
Initially, a phylogenetic tree depicting the genetic relationships of the isolates was constructed by using the whole genome sequence of the six isolates and those available in the GenBank (Figure 1A).
The company's technology enables a single individual to not only prepare, but also sequence a genome after performing only one sample preparation, irrespective of the size of the genome being investigated.
Controversies rage over who owns the information contained in the human genome, and over the ethics of cloning, gene-therapy trials, and most recently embryonic stem-cell research.
Each set of the genome contains the same genes on the same 23 chromosomes.
What's the Human Genome Project and why should I care?
In the December issue of Nature, the Human Genome Project published the genetic sequence of the first human chromosome to be fully mapped, chromosome 22.
0[TM], the second version of the company's genome interpretation engine.
The researchers chose this species for its relatively small genome and its importance in ecological systems and agriculture.
A large number of human diseases are mimicked in the tat model, and having the genome sequence lets us easily walk between what we understand in the physiology and biology in the rat, and translate that to a better understanding of human biology, and disease processes," says Susan Old, associate director of the Clinical and Molecular Disease Program in the NHLBI Division of Heart and Vascular Diseases and a project officer for the sequencing initiative.