carcinogen

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Related to genotoxic carcinogen: genotoxin

carcinogen:

see cancercancer,
in medicine, common term for neoplasms, or tumors, that are malignant. Like benign tumors, malignant tumors do not respond to body mechanisms that limit cell growth.
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carcinogen

[kär′sin·ə·jən]
(medicine)
Any agent that incites development of a carcinoma or any other sort of malignancy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

carcinogen

Pathol any substance that produces cancer
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
A better characterization of the performance of the CTA to detect non-genotoxic carcinogens was considered important because the data collected in the DRP were biased towards genotoxic carcinogens, which reflects data available in the public domain.
Often being found in baked, fried or grilled foods, acrylamide is a suspected carcinogen and the UK Committee on Carcinogenicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment states that exposure to genotoxic carcinogens should be as low as reasonably possible.
Genotoxic carcinogens, also known as DNA-reactive carcinogens, interact directly with DNA through the formation of covalent bonds, resulting in DNA-carcinogen complexes.
The experts also said fires at the works were also a source of genotoxic carcinogens. Even small exposure to those carried a small risk of causing cancer and the court heard that although the UK and European annual average air quality target for such hydrocarbons was unlikely to have been exceeded, "the additional exposures in local populations carry a small, but likely to be undetectable, increased risk of lung cancer".
The associated genotoxic carcinogens for several of these cancers, and also heart disease causation, are heterocyclic amines produced during the broiling and frying of creatinine containing foods such as meats.
From there, specific types of dose--response relationship, such as the sometimes controversial hormesis mechanism and always controversial biological thresholds for genotoxic carcinogens, are discussed, thereby supplementing the understanding of these latter critical concepts.
However, in the present study, which was shorter term and used a lower dose, we found no change in oxidative DNA-damage-related gene expression, nor did we find a gene expression profile characteristic of a range of genotoxic carcinogens, such as described by Ellinger-Ziegelbauer et al.
"At least," he says, "there is a contrast with tobacco smoke, where genotoxic carcinogens are clearly present and involved along with other types of effects, and carcinogen-DNA adducts have been observed in the breast tissue of exposed women."