gentleman


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gentleman

Brit History a man of gentle birth, who was entitled to bear arms, ranking above a yeoman in social position
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gentleman

 

(Russian, dzhentl’men). (1) A man of “well-born” origins, a nobleman. This usage is now considered obsolete.

(2) In Great Britain and other English-speaking countries, a man who strictly adheres to the bourgeois “society” rules of behavior and observes so-called good form.

(3) A polite form of address to men in English-speaking countries. In the figurative sense a gentleman is a man who has been well brought up.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
'Ten shillings too much,' said the gentleman in the white waistcoat.
nonsense!' said the gentleman in the white waistcoat.
'a sporting gentleman,' by some 'a thorough-bred Englishman,' by some 'a genuine John Bull;' but they all agreed in one respect, and that was, that it was a pity there were not more like him, and that because there were not, the country was going to rack and ruin every day.
Throwing himself into a great chair (in which, by the bye, he often snored away the night, when he had been, according to his admirers, a finer country gentleman than usual) he bade the man to tell his mistress to come down: and presently there appeared, a little flurried, as it seemed, by the unwonted summons, a lady much younger than himself, who had the appearance of being in delicate health, and not too happy.
I knew, just as sure as I was standing there on one leg, that this was the sort of girl who would have me and Gentleman out of that house about three seconds after the clergyman had tied the knot.
"Excellent," says Gentleman. "We'll come too." And we all goes along.
'I have had many a gentleman articled to me, ma'am, many a one.
To this the old gentleman replied that he felt assured they might.
The fair gentleman, seeing the signs of bad weather, desired to remain in Mr.
in an open barouche, the horses of which had been taken out, the better to accommodate it to the crowded place, stood a stout old gentleman, in a blue coat and bright buttons, corduroy breeches and top-boots, two young ladies in scarfs and feathers, a young gentleman apparently enamoured of one of the young ladies in scarfs and feathers, a lady of doubtful age, probably the aunt of the aforesaid, and Mr.
The lieutenant turned towards the other officers, and said, in a low voice: "If this gentleman speaks truth, there may still be some hope.
Though the fellow had received several kicks and cuffs from the little gentleman, who had more spirit than strength, he had made it a kind of scruple of conscience to strike his master, and would have contented himself with only choaking him; but towards Jones he bore no such respect; he no sooner therefore found himself a little roughly handled by his new antagonist, than he gave him one of those punches in the guts which, though the spectators at Broughton's amphitheatre have such exquisite delight in seeing them, convey but very little pleasure in the feeling.