geochemical evolution

geochemical evolution

[¦jē·ō¦kem·ə·kəl ‚ev·ə′lü·shən]
(geochemistry)
A change in any constituent of a rock beyond that amount present in the parent rock.
A change in chemical composition of a major segment of the earth during geologic time, as the oceans.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
2013, Geological and geochemical evolution of the Bolkardagi bauxite deposits, Karaman, Turkey: transformation from shale to bauxite.
2000, Geochemical evolution of paleolaterite: the interbasaltic Formation, Northern Ireland.
9:00 GEOCHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF GROUND AND SURFACE WATER THROUGH A WETLAND SYSTEM **, Jenna B.
Often Piper diagrams are mainly used for determining the water type, hydrochemical facieses and geochemical evolution paths.
Generally considering to Piper diagram, one major and one minor geochemical evolution paths are definite.
Geochemical evolution of ground water in the Great Plains aquifer of Nebraska: Implications for the management of a regional aquifer system.
Geologists and other earth scientists from Europe, North America, and Australia discuss such topics as the geochemistry and secular geochemical evolution of the Earth's mantle and lower crust, geochemistry of the oceanic crust, some perspectives on stable isotope geochemistry, the geochemistry of the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide, urban geochemistry, and archaeological and anthropological applications of isotopic and elemental geochemistry.
These papers concentrate on the geological activity in this ridge through North, Central and South America and how it contributes to magmatism, geochemical evolution, terrane accretion and flat subduction.
Factors that control the geochemical evolution of hydrothermal systems of alkaline water in granites in Central Pyrenees (Spain)
The selection of the sites for these studies was based on different aspects: first, granites are being considered in Spain, and other countries, as favourable host formations for nuclear waste disposal; second, the temperatures of deep aquifers in the thermal systems have been shown to be relatively low (from 75 to 115[degrees]C), similar to the maximum temperatures expected in nuclear waste repositories (ENRESA, 1997); third, the water compositions are similar to groundwaters at some proposed repository sites; and fourth, the high residence time of the waters in the systems studied (from 11000 to 16000 years) allows analyzing the geochemical evolution of the groundwaters regarding time.
The set of results from these studies has improved the existing knowledge on the characteristics and geochemical evolution of the groundwaters expected in a deep geological repository of radioactive wastes, and it is of great interest for performance assessment purposes.
In order to determine the effect of the residence time (RT) on the degree of geochemical evolution reached by the thermal solutions, as well as on the different behavior towards equilibrium with respect to albite, the thermal waters from the four systems considered were dated with [sup.