geodynamics

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geodynamics

[¦jē·ō·dī¦nam·iks]
(geophysics)
The branch of geophysics concerned with measuring, modeling, and interpreting the configuration and motion of the crust, mantle, and core of the earth.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Movement RMS errors for individual sites confirm again a fact that the movement data, especially the movement velocities (vectors) are available enough to be applied already for further geodynamic and/or geological interpretations.
Presentation of all observations in a uniform reference system will provide for their correct geodynamic interpretation.
The geodynamic evolution discussed is in good agreement with that generally accepted in the eastern sector of the Alpujarride Complex (Azanon et al., 1997; BoothRea et al., 2002; Martin-Rojas, 2006).
Brockmann, E.: 1996, Combination of Solutions for Geodetic and Geodynamic Applications of the Global Positioning System (GPS) PhD.
Its epicentre was 8 kilometres south-west of the town of Galaxidi, according to the Athens Geodynamic Institute.
This important geodynamic change induced upwelling of asthenosphere material, which led to adakitic magmatic activity and east-west extension.
Uzbekneftegaz and Russian oil and gas company Tatneft will jointly conduct research work on the development and production of shale oil and gas, bitumen and heavy oil, as well as monitoring geodynamic changes using satellite observation systems, the press service of the Uzbek oil and gas company said on November 23.
Greece's main earthquake monitoring center, Athens' University's Geodynamic Institute, measured the magnitude at 6.4, and said it had a depth of 5 kilometers.
Greece's main earthquake monitoring centre, Athens' Geodynamic Institute, measured the magnitude at 6.4, and said it had a depth of three miles.
"Optical clocks could help to establish a unified world height reference system with significant impact on geodynamic and climate research," researcher Heiner Denker said in the statement.
Seismically active regions, as well as areas that are under constant man-made load, require continuous local geodynamic monitoring.