geomagnetic field


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geomagnetic field

[¦jē·ō·mag¦ned·ik ′fēld]
(geophysics)
The earth's magnetic field.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our animal ancestry argues that geomagnetic field sensors should also be there representing not the sixth sense but perhaps the 10th or 11th human sense to be discovered."
Where a geomagnetic field was present and the tip of the sensor head for positive driving pulse input oriented to the west, the output voltage from the pickup coil was marked as a minimum output voltage, min ([V.sub.o]), as shown in Figure 5(a).
In the proposed algorithm, measurements of the angular rates are based on the geometric properties relating three consecutive samples of the geomagnetic field vector, processed in real time through a second-order low-pass filter.
Data analyses were performed to discern any potential relationship between geomagnetic field disturbances and spectral power fluctuations derived from microvolt measurements within coronal sections of fixed human brain tissue.
Thirteen observatories in both hemispheres record every 3 hours the variations of the horizontal component of the geomagnetic field. These variations are recorded based on a logarithmic scale that is called K indices.
[4] reported that the alignment of grazing and resting cattle and deer was disrupted by power lines, and the disruption was affected by the relative directions of the static geomagnetic field and the alternating MF from the power lines.
So, a large-scale solar magnetic field, extending in a cosmic space, influences a geomagnetic field. Besides, solar flares in the form of corpuscular flux also affect the geomagnetic field.
Earth's magnetic field, also known as the geomagnetic field, is the magnetic field that extends from the Earth's interior to where it meets the solar wind, a stream of charged particles emanating from the Sun.
Roger Brothers and Kenneth Lohmann of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill realized that if turtles homed in on beaches' unique magnetic signatures, their nests should migrate in response to subtle natural changes in the geomagnetic field. Over 19 years, the scientists found that the nests of sea turtles in Florida shifted along with gradual changes in magnetic fields: The nests clustered more densely in places where magnetic signatures got closer together and spread out where signatures drifted apart, the researchers report in the Feb.
During a geomagnetic storm, the variations of the geomagnetic field induce a slowly changing electric field on the Earth's surface.
By convention, these fields are divided into those that are fixed (termed Hard-Iron effects) and those that influence or distort geomagnetic field (termed Soft-Iron effects).