geomagnetic storm


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

geomagnetic storm

[¦jē·ō·mag¦ned·ik ′stȯrm]
(geophysics)
References in periodicals archive ?
05) These data indicate that right parahippocampal but not hippocampal or left hemispheric background microvolt fluctuation periodicities were affected by geomagnetic storm conditions within fixed human brain tissue.
Patrick's Day on March 17, 2015, many sky gazers around the world were entranced by a supersized geomagnetic storm -- one of the biggest of the past decade -- that lit the sky with red, purple and green auroras.
The most severe geomagnetic storm in recorded history occurred two years before the start of the American Civil War and has become the touchstone for those who monitor gray swan emerging risks.
According to a recent report published by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa), the geomagnetic storm that started at the beginning of May will last until October 29.
And since communication systems (like telephones, radio and the Internet) all rely on the ground-based electrical supply, these are all vulnerable to an intense geomagnetic storm.
Factors like a city's geomagnetic latitude, ground conductivity and distance from the coast's highly conducive seawater can make certain regions more susceptible to geomagnetic storms than other.
During geomagnetic storms that produce extremely bright auroras shimmering all across the sky, only circular fisheye lenses, such as an 8-mm fisheye, can record the entire sky in a single frame.
The defence select committee quoted from the National Security Strategy, which found in 2010 that: "Severe space weather, which might cause geomagnetic storms impacting the earth's magnetosphere, has been the subject of extensive research over the past year.
Summary: The strongest geomagnetic storm in more than six years is set to hit Earth's magnetic field on Tuesday and it could affect airline routes and power grids.
Essentially, geomagnetic storm categories from G2 to G5 and solar radiation storm categories from S2 to S5 can affect satellite navigation and specifically have an effect on altering satellite orbits.
An especially strong geomagnetic storm has started late in the night Sunday, according to the Russian Lebedev Physics Institute.
The great geomagnetic storm of 1859, for instance, occurred during a solar cycle of about the same size we're predicting for 2013.