geomagnetic storm


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geomagnetic storm

[¦jē·ō·mag¦ned·ik ′stȯrm]
(geophysics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Geomagnetic storms create large disturbances in the ionosphere," NOAA said in a (https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/impacts/space-weather-and-gps-systems) statement .
In order to detect ionospheric anomalies due to the geomagnetic storm of April 20, 2018, global maps of VTEC provided by CODE were used.
During strong geomagnetic storms there was a significant increase in power spectra within the 7.5 Hz to 14 Hz range within the right but not the left parahippocampal gyrus compared to days with relatively quiet geomagnetic activity.
Improving forecasts and studying auroras are important because auroras are features of geomagnetic storms. While geomagnetic storms can lead to beautiful auroras, they can also cause power outages and interrupt satellite systems.
(4.) Kappenman, J., "Geomagnetic Storms and Their Impacts on the U.S.
The most severe geomagnetic storm in recorded history occurred two years before the start of the American Civil War and has become the touchstone for those who monitor gray swan emerging risks.
Therefore, during an intensive geomagnetic storm and when the direction of the geoelectric field coincides with the direction of EPG objects location on the geographical map of the territory, considerable geomagnetically induced currents are possible in the neutrals and grounded windings of PT and phase wires of PTL.
According to a recent report published by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa), the geomagnetic storm that started at the beginning of May will last until October 29.
Still, a recent report on the nuclear hazards of EMP attacks concludes that only 33 reactors in the US are not vulnerable to total grid failure following an intense geomagnetic storm. The vulnerability is concentrated in two areas: the northwest (Oregon and Washington) and the entire coastal area east of the Mississippi.
Factors like a city's geomagnetic latitude, ground conductivity and distance from the coast's highly conducive seawater can make certain regions more susceptible to geomagnetic storms than other.
This index ranges from 0, which is low activity, to 9, which means that a powerful geomagnetic storm is underway.
"A solar flare or geomagnetic storm, over which we have no control but which will inevitably happen from time to time, could produce a similar catastrophic result.