geometric distribution


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geometric distribution

[¦jē·ə¦me·trik ‚dis·trə′byü·shən]
(statistics)
A discrete probability distribution whose probability function is given by the equation P (x) = p (1 -p) x- 1for x any positive integer, p (x) = 0 otherwise, when 0 ≤ p ≤ 1; the mean is 1/ p.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present case, two factors may have contributed to this result: (1) the geometric distribution is a special case of the negative binomial distribution; and (2) relative to one q per class, having one or more classes with multiple q results in a lower [chi square] and thus makes it more difficult to distinguish between distributions.
Simulation of Geometric and Negative Binomial random variables Geometric distribution
We introduce a power series whose coffecients are probabiliteis of hyper geometric distribution
The idea is that each station of a class c; c [member of] [0, C - 1], will draw a backoff time from a truncated geometric distribution of a parameter [[alpha].
The value of the inverse fine structure constant reflecting the 2-sided geometric distribution of the frequencies of the path of the electron in the ground state of Hydrogen atom can be calculated with the help of equations (1), (4), (5) and (6):
In fact, for the geometric distribution to emerge, seed 1 must be better than the rest of the field by the same margin as seed 2 is better than the lower-seeded teams; the same is true for seeds 2 and 3, 3 and 4, and so on.
j=1] 1/j for the the nth harmonic number, Exp([lambda]) denotes the exponential distribution with parameter [lambda], and Geo(p) is the geometric distribution with parameter (success probability) p.
Formally, if there is a series of independent trials of process in which the probability of a "success" at any one trial is a constant p, then the time to achieving the first "success" is given by the geometric distribution with parameter values:
Although the geometric distribution has been discussed in many books, some books presented the expected value in equation (4) (e.
While the geometric distribution seems a sensible approach to using information provided by the callback number to furnish a weight for nonresponse adjustment, it does have a couple of problems.
Independently, Glushkovsky[5], Goh[6] and Calvin[7] had earlier made the use of geometric distribution for process control of near zero-defects processes.
Thus, I first compared the frequency of persistence times to a geometric distribution (Hastings and Peacock 1974), the expected distribution of discrete-valued persistence in months, under the null hypothesis of constant probability of disappearance (Holgate 1964).