geometrical distortion

geometrical distortion

[¦jē·ə¦me·trə·kəl di′stȯr·shən]
(computer science)
A discrepancy between the horizontal and vertical dimensions of the picture elements on an electronic display, causing, for example, circles to appear as ovals unless corrected for in software.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, lowering the risks of these systems in creating geometrical distortion will be prioritized by intraoperative MRI equipment manufacturers in the foreseeable future.
The technology offers reduced manufacturing costs for products with requirements of selective zone hardening, less geometrical distortion during heat treatment, as well as improved quality assurance via monitoring and control systems.
information such as its geometrical distortion and the exact position of its
The new intelligent i-CS lens directly exchanges information such, as geometrical distortion and the exact position of its zoom, focus and iris opening.
At various times Bouska, Link, Ashbrook, and Soulsby all reported the umbra to be wider east-west than it ought to be, even allowing for Earth's slight spread at the equator and the geometrical distortion in a converging light cone at the Moon's distance.
The number of connected objects is invariable to the geometrical distortion of an image from a theoretical point of view, unless the image is torn up.
Cooled CCD cameras have several advantages for digital imaging over unintensified and intensified video detectors, including dynamic range, linearity, low noise, and little geometrical distortion. The Hamamatsu C4880 was chosen because it has two readout modes: a fast scan mode (up to 7 frames/s) which is useful for focusing, and a slow scan mode (12 bit/pixel, 500,000 bytes/s readout rate), which gives the most useful dynamic range (4000 grey levels above a noise floor of about 50 [+ or -] 10).
The ability to predict and optimize the geometrical distortions of cylinder liner has generated significant interest in recent years.
This is manifest not only as changes in length (linear expansion) but also due to the geometrical distortions caused by the combined effects of temperature, vacuum and pressure over the course of the cycle.
Robustness of the steganography technique is desired when the carrier media will be passed through some signal processing operations (filtering, compression, etc.), or some geometrical distortions (rotation, translation, scaling, etc.).