geometrical factor

geometrical factor

[¦jē·ə¦me·trə·kəl ′fak·tər]
(navigation)
In loran and similar navigation systems, the ratio of the linear distance between a point on a loran line of position (hyperbola) and the nearest point on an adjacent line of the same family of lines to the interval between the corresponding time difference.
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References in periodicals archive ?
where Y is the geometrical factor given by the following formula [14]:
c] is the fracture load, a is crack length, w is the specimen width, t is the specimen thickness, and f(a/w) is a geometrical factor.
The new formulations reveal that the geometrical factor plays a key role in characterizing the real part of the effective permeability and the physical factor contributes to the magnetic loss tangent (MLT) of AMMs.
In other words, M* is a geometrical factor and it depends on the way the bending moment is applied.
Using the membrane permeation model, the effective diffusion coefficient is measured by measuring polymer intrinsic diffusion coefficient and solubility of the gas component in the polymer matrix for all the gases involved (14, 15): it is also necessary to assume a geometrical factor that accounts for the influence of foam morphology on the effective diffusion coefficient.
Because the former angle is larger than the latter one, geometrical optics suggests that the total power detected depends only on the blackbody temperature and a geometrical factor related to the pinhole aperture, detector optics, and relative separation, because the detector pupil is overfilled.
In traditional lenticular or parallax barrier systems, the radiation profile is largely constrained by geometrical factors such as physical LCD pixel layout and aperture shape.
In literature, is appreciated the contribution of different sources to these errors, concluding the fact that errors due to the geometrical factors represent (9095)% of robots and manipulators pose errors.
This slight nodding of the disk, called libration, results from the not-quite-constant velocity of the Moon in its orbit and other geometrical factors.
Their geometrical factors, along with operating stresses and corrosive operating environments require a deep understanding of the material requirements for long-lived suction roll shells.
B] are geometrical factors based on sample symmetry and related to the two resistance ratios [Q.