geophagia

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geophagia

[‚jē·ə′fā·jə]
(zoology)
Soil ingestion by animals.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The consumption of fine-textured soils by birds and other vertebrate has often been linked to a need for animals to supplement diets that are deficient in certain mineral elements (Jones and Hanson, 1985; Gilardi et al., 1999), leading many researchers studying geophagy to analyze the mineral content of geophagic soils.
The soil was administered by gavage based on the daily limits considered by the US Environmental Protection Agency [USEPA] (1996), which admits the voluntary ingestion of 10 g of soil in a single geophagy event, considering a human weighing 70 kg.
Geophagy and its association with geohelminth infection in rural schoolchildren from northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
Macroterme geophagy and pregnancy clays in southern Africa.
[23.] Geissler PW, Shulman CE, Prince RJ, Mutemi W, Mzani C, Friis H and B Lowe Geophagy, iron status and anaemia among pregnant women on the coast of Kenya.
Geophagy can vary seasonally and geographically, and could serve different purposes for different taxa.
(2010) Risk of human exposure to arsenic and other toxic elements from geophagy: trace element analysis of baked clay using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.
("Why Is Geophagy Treated Like Dirt?" inquires one such study.) (44) Whereas researchers often describe clay-eaters in the Southern U.S.
As one with an interest in geophagy (Rowland 2002), I found Chapters 1, 2, 5 and 7 of greatest interest.
This ingestive behavior, called geophagy (or pica), is exhibited by numerous types of predator after ingestion of toxic foods (Kruelen, 1985; Johns, 1990; Klaus et al., 1998; Krishnamani and Mahaney, 2000; Wilson, 2003).
Worldwide research has demonstrated the existence and importance of local knowledge systems about soils and mineral materials, not only related to agriculture, including other behavioral realms, such as craftsmanship, fisheries, healing practices, building construction, mining, ritual body painting, salt production, and geophagy, among others.
Mineral Licks, Geophagy, and Biogeochemistry of North American Ungulates.