geostationary satellite


Also found in: Acronyms.

geostationary satellite

[¦jē·ō¦stā·shə‚ner·ē ′sad·əl‚īt]
(aerospace engineering)
A satellite that follows a circular orbit in the plane of the earth's equator from west to east at such a speed as to remain fixed over a given place on the equator at an altitude of 22,280 miles (35,860 kilometers).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers noted that the geostationary satellites can measure levels of smoke, dust, and other harmful pollution at various altitudes--known as aerosol optical depth--every hour and in high resolution.
Thanks to their high altitude, just three geostationary satellites can cover the entire earth while they are on a communication mission in unison, at any given time.
The primary distinction between low-Earth-orbit, or LEO, systems and geostationary satellites is that the LEO system's wireless receiver/transmitters are moving.
In October 1945 Wireless World published his article "Extraterrestrial Relays," which laid down the principle of geostationary satellites. Three communications satellites, positioned 120[degrees] apart in a geostationary orbit, or "Clarke orbit," as some now call it, would cover the globe except the polar regions.
The main difference between the East system based on a single geostationary satellite, and networks such as Globalstar, which requires 56 satellites in orbit, and Iridium, with 66 satellites in orbit, is that the latter have much higher overheads to cover.
The Ariane 5 rocket will carry two satellites - Saudi Geostationary Satellite 1/Hellas Sat 4 and the GSAT-31.
Saudi Arabia is set to launch the Saudi Geostationary Satellite 1 (SGS-1), its 16 th satellite into space this evening.
Its stations support low Earth orbit and geostationary satellite optical communications, enabling secure transmissions between satellites, other spacecraft, unmanned aerial vehicles and high-altitude aircrafts.
The National Weather Service faced a dilemma this summer: The sole geostationary satellite used to monitor weather conditions over the United States would reach the end of its scheduled lifetime next year, yet equipment malfunctions and construction delays continued to plague the NASA-built replacement (SN:7/6/91, p.5).
The 1,647kg Angosat geostationary satellite was produced at Russia's Energiya Rocket and Space Corporation under a contract with the Angolan Telecommunications and Information Technology Ministry.
O3b will provide geostationary satellite backhaul connectivity to RCS-Communication's WiMAX network in Juba, the capital city of South Sudan.

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