geostrophic flow

geostrophic flow

[¦jē·ō¦sträf·ik ′flō]
(geophysics)
A form of gradient flow where the Coriolis force exactly balances the horizontal pressure force.
References in periodicals archive ?
These regions include continental shelves (Mackinnon and Gregg 2003), strong geostrophic flow regimes over rough topography (Waterman et al.
Nurser, 2011: Global rate and spectral characteristics of internal gravity wave generation by geostrophic flow over topography.
4, the mean flow direction around the EIP is predominantly westward due to the propagation of mesoscale eddies, which have a higher mean speed than the mean geostrophic flow heading east.
Because mesoscale eddies have a higher speeds than the mean geostrophic flow, the mesoscale variability could be playing an important role in the formation of submesoscale eddies around these oceanic islands.
We used CalCOFI data to model the likelihood of capturing Pacific mackerel larvae as a function of water temperature, zooplankton displacement volume, geostrophic flow (i.
Mixed-layer depth was used as an indicator of stratification of the water column, and geostrophic flow as a measure of horizontal current strength, both of which also potentially affected production and food availability (Mantyla et al.
This information becomes especially vital in Estonian nearshore waters where a complex interplay of the large-scale air flow with surface roughness and the presence of large-scale features such as the North Estonian klint cause substantial in homogeneity of average wind properties in different coastal areas [1,2], and where the mismatch of the orientation of coastline and the dominant direction of the geostrophic flow give rise to specific phenomena such as low-level jets along the coastline [3] (strong, apparently channelled easterly winds along the central part of the Gulf of Finland during certain seasons), or mismatch between directions of the most frequent and strongest winds [2].
Holomorphic structures in hydrodynamical models of nearly geostrophic flow.
Such boundary layers, or similar ones, are required to connect principally geostrophic flow in the interior of the fluid to horizontal boundaries where conditions like a prescribed horizontal stress, or no-slip on a solid bottom, are given.
We welcome the interesting recent paper by Haine and Cherian (2013, hereafter HC13), which introduced a physical analogy between the motion of a mechanical gyroscope and two geophysical flow phenomena that occur in the rotating shallow-water (RSW) equations: namely, geostrophic flow and inertial oscillations.
A likely explanation of the goodness of the Princeton Ocean Model in the present application is that the circulation is governed by the pressure gradient and the Coriolis acceleration for which the model provides a very good representation although the [sigma]-coordinates may cause a small erroneous component on geostrophic flows due to numerical truncation error in the calculation of the pressure gradient (Mellor et al.