geosynchronous orbit


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geosynchronous orbit

(jee-oh-sink -rŏ-nŭs) An Earth orbit made by an artificial satellite (moving west to east) that has a period of 24 hours, equal to the Earth's period of rotation on its axis. If the orbit is inclined to the equatorial plane the satellite will appear from Earth to trace out a figure-of-eight, once per day, between latitudes corresponding to the angle of orbital inclination to the equator. If the 24-hour orbit lies in the equatorial plane, and is circular, the satellite will appear from Earth to be almost stationary; the orbit and orbiting body are then termed geostationary. A geostationary orbit has an altitude of 36 000 km.

A geosynchronous or geostationary orbit is very difficult to achieve, requiring a very high orbital velocity. Satellites in such orbits are used for communications and navigation and also for certain types of Earth observations. Most communications satellites are now geostationary, with groups of three or more, spaced around the orbit, giving global coverage.

geosynchronous orbit

[‚jē·ō¦siŋ·krə·nəs ′ȯr·bət]
(aerospace engineering)
A satellite orbit that has a period of one sidereal day (23 hours, 56 minutes, 4 seconds). Abbreviated GEO.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We can launch larger payloads into near-earth or geosynchronous orbits using less energy.
So make no mistake, from the first flight that a lieutenant takes in a trainer or from the first opportunity one of our space operators has to operate a spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit and to be able to see the earth and to be able to look at this from the perspective of an Airman, it fundamentally alters your approach to how you contribute to warfare in the joint and coalition setting.
With its advanced upper stage, Delta IV Heavy can take more than 14,500 pounds directly to geosynchronous orbit, as well as a wide variety of complex interplanetary trajectories.
It rotates Earth in geosynchronous orbit, meaning it stays in one spot in the Earth's orbit, so that it can be right above the system it reports to, (https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sdo/overview/index.html) says NASA .
Now in geosynchronous orbit at 22,236 miles (35,786 kilometers) above the earth, the latest-generation Ka-band satellite was manufactured by Space Systems Loral and launched on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V launch vehicle from the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Florida on December 18, 2016.
The satellite was launched Friday, May 6, 2016 out of Cape Canaveral by SpaceX as the payload of the first SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket to launch a satellite for geosynchronous orbit, and safely return to earth.
The report listed several incidents where China demonstrated these types of capabilities including: a 2007 anti-satellite missile test that resulted in the deliberate destruction of a defunct weather satellite and generated hundreds of pieces of debris; a 2013 launch that propelled an object moving on a trajectory toward geosynchronous orbit where many nations maintain communications and remote-sensing satellites; and an assumed 2014 follow-up test to the 2007 launch, though no satellites were destroyed.
The satellite will eventually make its way to a geosynchronous orbit about 35,900 km above Asia, where it will provide telecommunication services for 15 years.
The 2014 Mercedes-Benz S550 4Matic sedan is so advanced it should be in geosynchronous orbit over Gstaad.
Each Inmarsat-5 satellite will carry 89 Ka-band beams that will operate in geosynchronous orbit providing flexible global coverage.
The new satellite, which will provide additional L-band mobile satellite communications capacity over Europe, the Middle East and Africa, reached geosynchronous orbit on Friday, Inmarsat said.
According to Gregan, NawaSat, is made possible by a cooperation agreement with satellite service provider SES, which owns a network of 52 satellites in geosynchronous orbit around the globe.