germ theory


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germ theory

[′jərm ‚thē·ə·rē]
(medicine)
The theory that contagious and infectious diseases are caused by microorganisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
For a discussion of the resistance of American public health officials to the germ theory and their eventual acceptance of the theory see Phyllis Richmond, "American Attitudes Toward the Germ Theory," Journal of History of Medicine, 1954, 428-54; See also Schultz, 138.
One of these was germ theory and the movement toward antisepsis and asepsis it fostered.
This moral dimension is crucial to understanding how the social judgments made possible by miasmatism were never fully abdicated, but instead blended into germ theory to create what Barnes (2006) has called a "sanitary-bacteriological-synthesis."
Second, it required the science of germ theory, as described by Koch and others, to demonstrate causation.
Long-term, however, the integration of AI into various facets of medicine could produce a revolution not seen since the discovery of antibiotics or the discovery of germ theory. The ability to tap the sum total of human knowledge in a particular field and to then apply that to an individual's specific genome or particular situation could yield dramatically better outcomes than those we see today.
The medical industry is always innovating and improving their ability to prevent the spread of infectious diseases--the paradigm shift from miasma theory to germ theory ushered in a wave of new techniques and best practices.
However it was Louis Pasteur, who found that diseases arise from germs attacking the body from outside and termed it as 'the germ theory of disease'.
Support the Mountain begins with germ theory as the model underpinning the Western pharmaceutical perspective and postulating that microscopic pathogens cause all human disease by attacking the body from the outside, implying that we have no control over manifesting illness.
It comes from a time when the forerunners of physicians were called "leeches," and when germ theory was unknown--but the Dark Ages may be casting some light on modern science.
Cutting-edge research and historical background on the evolution of gut bacteria make it easier to, er, digest this dramatic shift away from the germ theory paradigm, with its focus on external causes of disease.
If Abraham Lincoln were to describe the germ theory, I think he might have put it something like this: "You can infect some of the people all of the time, and infect all of the people some of the time; but you cannot infect all of the people all of the time."
The discovery and diffusion of the germ theory of disease were central to the reduction of infectious disease and child mortality.