Teucrium

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Teucrium

 

a genus of plants of the family Labiatae. They are perennial, sometimes annual, herbs, semishrubs, or shrubs. The leaves are entire and pinnatilobate or pinnatisect. The flowers are bilabiate and deep blue, purple, or sometimes white or yellow, arranged in spicate, racemose, or paniculate inflorescences. There are more than 100 (according to some data, up to 300) species, found mainly in the Mediterranean region. In the USSR there are more than 20 species, growing for the most part in the southern European part and in the Caucasus. The most common is golden germander (T. polium). The leaves of T. polium and T. scordium are sometimes used as a spice. A number of species, including T. massiliense and T. orientate, are raised as ornamentals.

References in periodicals archive ?
Hepatitis after germander (Teucrium chamaedrys) administration: another instance of herbal medicine hepatotoxicity.
Hepatitis observed during a treatment with a drug or tea containing Wild Germander Evaluation of 26 cases reported to the Regional Centers of Pharmacovigilance.
Fau D, Lekehal M, Farrell G, Moreau A, Moulis C, Feldmann G, Haouzi D, Pessayre D (1997) Diterpenoids from germander, an herbal medicine, induce apoptosis in isolated rat hepatocytes.
Some substances for which safety concerns have been raised are comfrey, chaparral, lobelia, germander, aristolochia, ephedra (ma huang), L-tryptophan, germanium, magnolia-stephania and stimulant laxative ingredients, such as those found in dieter's teas.
SHRUBS: Cape plumbago, escallonia, flowering maple, germander, hibiscus, oleander, salvia, shrub roses, tree mallow.
Nearby grows Thymelaea hirsuta and a great variety of more continental species such as large yellow restharrow (Ononis natrix) and felty germander (Teucrium polium subsp.
Hepatotoxicity has been reported with many other "natural" herbal products such as germander, chaparral, senna, mistletoe, skullcap, comfrey, and herbal teas (Borins, 1998).
Germander, which is often mixed with other herbs to treat obesity, has been linked to 27 cases of acute nonviral hepatitis in France, the magazine notes.
Recently, germander (Teucriurn chamaedrys), in the form of a tea or capsule, has been reported to cause hepatotoxicity (4), and other herbs known to have hepatotoxic properties include Senecio longilobus (groundsel), Scutellaria laterifolia (skullcap), Symphyturn spp.
The herb is germander (Teucrium chamaedrys), a member of the mint family whose blossoms are used in teas, tonics, and herbal capsules.
The young mum, pictured, of Germander Drive, Tamebridge, Walsall, battled her way through a tough regional final at Wolverhampton's Wulfrun Hall to reach the grand final, which will be held at Portsmouth Guildhall on November 29.
Gary McLardy reports many germander speedwells, Solomon's seal and wild privets at Lifeboat Road, Formby.