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get

Informal (in tennis) a successful return of a shot that was difficult to reach
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

get

[get]
(computer science)
An instruction in a computer program to read data from a file.
(industrial engineering)
A combination of two or more of the elemental motions of search, select, grasp, transport empty, and transport loaded; applied to time-motion studies.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

get

(1) In programming, a request for the next record in an input file. Contrast with put.

(2) An FTP command used to download a file from a server or to display the contents of a text file. See ftp commands.

(3) (GET) An HTTP command used to retrieve data from a Web server. See HTTP GET.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A 4:00pm departure the next afternoon meant we had just enough time before dark to get to the big set of blocks to see that the landing was practically a lake--so much for Bastien's biggest half-Cab flip--and a last-minute stop at Brooklyn Banks had us looking at each other thinking, "OK, who wants to try the switch flip wallride?" Despite all our good intentions for a last-minute NYC push, it was pretty obvious that the KOTR 2005 was over for the Flip team.
Band) on her hit single "No One." Songwriter/producer James Mtume, who hit it big in the late 1970s and early '80s with such hits as "The Closer I Get To You" (Roberta Flack), "You Know How To Love Me" (Phyllis Hyman) and his own singles "Juicy Fruit" and "You, Me and He," has also had a number of his tunes sampled by other songwriters.
In Taiwan or South Korea, only a minority of applicants will get to go to any college at all; in England, if you don't go to Oxford or Cambridge, you have no chance at a wide range of important positions in the society.
"The men get to turn more, jump more--it's closer to what I grew up with [in France]." Like Weese, she emphasizes getting back to basics.