get

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get

Informal (in tennis) a successful return of a shot that was difficult to reach
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

get

[get]
(computer science)
An instruction in a computer program to read data from a file.
(industrial engineering)
A combination of two or more of the elemental motions of search, select, grasp, transport empty, and transport loaded; applied to time-motion studies.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

get

(1) In programming, a request for the next record in an input file. Contrast with put.

(2) An FTP command used to download a file from a server or to display the contents of a text file. See ftp commands.

(3) (GET) An HTTP command used to retrieve data from a Web server. See HTTP GET.
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References in classic literature ?
Matthew is getting up in years, you know--he's sixty-- and he isn't so spry as he once was.
You don't know what you're getting. You're bringing a strange child into your house and home and you don't know a single thing about him nor what his disposition is like nor what sort of parents he had nor how he's likely to turn out.
Alice watched the White King as he slowly struggled up from bar to bar, till at last she said, 'Why, you'll be hours and hours getting to the table, at that rate.
She said afterwards that she had never seen in all her life such a face as the King made, when he found himself held in the air by an invisible hand, and being dusted: he was far too much astonished to cry out, but his eyes and his mouth went on getting larger and larger, and rounder and rounder, till her hand shook so with laughing that she nearly let him drop upon the floor.
'While we were getting it back again the parrot, which was in its cage, let out a squawk.
"Oh, come on, don't let us stop," said Arthur, who was getting excited at the sight of the wood.
Martin and Tom, both of whom had irons on, tried it without success at first; the fir bark broke away where they stuck the irons in as soon as they leant any weight on their feet, and the grip of their arms wasn't enough to keep them up; so, after getting up three or four feet, down they came slithering to the ground, barking their arms and faces.
I wonder whether the gentlemen who make a business and a living out of writing books, ever find their own selves getting in the way of their subjects, like me?
He's getting round all right--but stewing in a broth of trouble, as usual, poor man.
"How could he help getting the mumps, poor fellow?"
I don't feel as if it was worth while to turn my hand over for anything, and I'm getting dreadfully fretful and querulous.
The getting of your anchor was a noisy operation on board a merchant ship of yesterday - an inspiring, joyous noise, as if, with the emblem of hope, the ship's company expected to drag up out of the depths, each man all his personal hopes into the reach of a securing hand - the hope of home, the hope of rest, of liberty, of dissipation, of hard pleasure, following the hard endurance of many days between sky and water.