giant hogweed


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giant hogweed

giant hogweed

Grows up to 17 feet high. Do not touch! Blisters skin, long-lasting scars, and—if it comes in contact with eyes—blindness. Numerous white flowers clustered in an umbrella-shaped head that is up to 80 centimetres (31 in) in diameter across its flat top. Dark reddish-purple stem and spotted leaf stalks that are hollow and produce sturdy bristles. Giant Hogweed is a photo-toxic plant. Its sap can cause phytophotodermatitis (severe skin inflammations) when the skin is exposed to sunlight or to UV-rays. Initially the skin turns red and starts itching. Then blisters form as it burns within 48 hours. They form black or purplish scars that can last several years. Protective clothing, including eye protection, should be worn when handling or digging it. If skin is exposed, the affected area should be washed thoroughly with soap and water and the exposed skin protected from the sun for several days. Also called Giant Cow Parsley, but not the same as common, much smaller cow parsley, which is edible.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Oregon Department of Agriculture put out its first warning about giant hogweed last summer - the first confirmed sighting in Oregon was in Oakridge - and it now has spread to about 50 sites around the state, most in the Portland area.
A Spirit Pub Company spokesperson said: "We have been taking appropriate action to treat the giant hogweed since it was identified.
Brecon Beacons National Park's Howard Morgan is dwarfed by a giant hogweed on the River Usk
Anyone who touches giant hogweed should wash immediately with soap and water.
He used some leaves off a plant to wipe mud from his legs, not knowing it was giant hogweed.
The project also aims to stop and reverse the damage caused by invasive exotic plants, such as giant hogweed, Japanese knotweed, Himalayan Balsam, as well as non-native conifers (Sitka spruce) in the river s riparian zone.
Other animal marauders include Chinese mitten crabs and zebra mussels, Plants include Japanese knotweed, Himalayan balsam, Australian swamp stonecrop, water fern, giant hogweed and floating pennywort.
Giant hogweed also shades out native plants and the voids left when its large roots die back creates riverbank erosion.
Also in the officer's sights will be other invasive species such as the Japanese knotweed, the Himalayan balsam and giant hogweed, which are also gaining a foothold.
The Giant hogweed eradication campaign in Belgium, for example, will be undermined if the species reinvades from France.
It was the same year Giant Hogweed and Japanese Knotweed were introduced to Britain.
AN invasion of the giant hogweed is to be repelled in a pounds 2.