giant hogweed


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giant hogweed

giant hogweed

Grows up to 17 feet high. Do not touch! Blisters skin, long-lasting scars, and—if it comes in contact with eyes—blindness. Numerous white flowers clustered in an umbrella-shaped head that is up to 80 centimetres (31 in) in diameter across its flat top. Dark reddish-purple stem and spotted leaf stalks that are hollow and produce sturdy bristles. Giant Hogweed is a photo-toxic plant. Its sap can cause phytophotodermatitis (severe skin inflammations) when the skin is exposed to sunlight or to UV-rays. Initially the skin turns red and starts itching. Then blisters form as it burns within 48 hours. They form black or purplish scars that can last several years. Protective clothing, including eye protection, should be worn when handling or digging it. If skin is exposed, the affected area should be washed thoroughly with soap and water and the exposed skin protected from the sun for several days. Also called Giant Cow Parsley, but not the same as common, much smaller cow parsley, which is edible.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz
References in periodicals archive ?
Common and giant hogweed both pose a threat to anyone who comes into contact with them.
You can read more about giant hogweed at https://riverholmeconnections.
The sap of Giant hogweed contains a toxic chemical which sensitises the skin and leads to severe blistering, when exposed to sunlight."
Pysek, "Remote sensing as a tool for monitoring plant invasions: Testing the effects of data resolution and image classification approach on the detection of a model plant species Heracleum mantegazzianum (giant hogweed)", in Int.
Anyone who comes in contact with the weed is advised to cover up the affected area, to prevent the sap reacting with sunlight, and to wash it with soap and water Giant hogweed, an invasive species that resembles native cow parsley or hogweed, has large leaves, spotted leaf stalks and a hollow, reddish-purple stem with fine spines that make it appear furry, much like a stinging nettle.
HAZARDOUS: Giant hogweed, above, can cause blistering, foxgloves, right, are poisonous and laurel bushes, below, you make you sleepy DECEIVING: Glory Lily (Gloriosa superba) is beautiful to look at but very poisonous
And he added: "Our volunteers can't wait to be unleashed on Japanese knotweed, grey squirrels or giant hogweed.
'One study has looked at the spread of giant hogweed, which is invasive species with implications an for health and safety.
For example, giant hogweed is a plant that often invades along rivers.
Ecology and management of giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazziannum).
Another invader that officials are trying to control locally is giant hogweed, a fast-growing plant that can reach heights of 15 feet and favors wetlands and stream banks.
It's unlikely you'll come across giant hogweed, which plagues North America.