giant star


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Related to giant star: red giant star, Supergiant Star

giant star:

see red giantred giant,
star that is relatively cool but very luminous because of its great size. All normal stars are expected to pass eventually through a red-giant phase as a consequence of stellar evolution.
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giant star

See giant.

giant star

[¦jī·ənt ′stär]
(astronomy)
One of a class of stars that is 20 or 30 or more times larger than the sun and over 100 times more luminous.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the future, the researchers would like to make even more detailed images of the surface of giant stars and follow the evolution of these granules continuously, instead of only getting snapshot images.
A "symbiotic X-ray binary" 6 a star system made up of a red giant star and a neutron star 6 is extremely rare.
"It's hard to say if giant planets would be less likely to form in giant star disks," Melis says.
The researchers interpret this X-ray emission to be caused by the collision between supernova debris and disk-shaped material that the giant star expelled before the explosion.
The remaining, gravitationally-crushed relic of that giant star, most likely a black hole, feeds on gas from a very close, companion star.
"What we are seeing in splendid detail with these observations is the final act of a dying red giant star, as it sheds most of its gaseous bulk in a strong, outflowing wind.
If the companion were a star like ours, or even a giant star, a sizeable portion of the debris blown away from the supernova would contain atoms of the element hydrogen.
The team, who have been studying meteorites for more than five years, concluded that the strikes were caused by high-energy gamma rays that are thought to be given off when a giant star dies.
Though vastly different in scale, a giant star near the end of its life and a clump of lithium atoms chilled to a temperature near absolute zero may share a similar fate.
The red giant star observed by the astronomers, J0247-25, had a recent stellar collision and the team discovered the star was a new type of pulsating stars.
At the right, hydrogen gas is ionized by the light of Sigma Scorpi and fluoresces to produce a reddish emission nebula, while the red giant star Antares (bottom left) casts its orange glow on surrounding dust clouds.
They believe that the heat created in six billion years' time, when our sun eventually swells into a giant star, will warm the icy surface of one of Saturn's moons, Titan.