gigaelectronvolt


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gigaelectronvolt

[¦gig·ə·i′lek‚trän‚vōlt]
(physics)
A unit of energy, used primarily in high-energy physics, equal to 109 electronvolts or approximately 11.602 × 10-10 joule. Abbreviated GeV.
References in periodicals archive ?
The teams - Atlas and CMS - said their data showed "spikes" at roughly the same mass - 124 to 125 gigaelectronvolts. Fabiola Gianotti, the spokeswoman for Atlas's 3000 physicists, said they were close to having enough data to solve the puzzle.
(At a momentum of 3.57 GeV/c - that is, gigaelectronvolts divided by the speed of light - the particles are moving at almost 97 percent of the speed of light; at 0.6 GeV/c they are traveling at more than 50 percent of the speed of light.)
In particular, a tantalizing "bump" in 2015 data at 750 gigaelectronvolts, which had been previously detected by the ATLAS and CMS detectors, did not resurface in the much larger 2016 dataset, suggesting that it was, in all probability, the result of a statistical fluctuation.
The "all-sky map" represents all of the gamma-ray detections above 10 gigaelectronvolts that the Fermi telescope has seen in three years' worth of data.
What's more, the signal peaked at 620 gigaelectronvolts and then rapidly declined to the background level.
The best guess of most physicists is that the Higgs weighs somewhere between 114 and 600 gigaelectronvolts (109 electronvolts), according to Sergio Bertolucci, CERN's director for research and computing.
The Earth-orbiting craft will detect gamma rays with energies up to 300 gigaelectronvolts (GeV), far beyond the 20 GeV energies that previous instruments in space have reached.
In particular, a tantalizing "bump" in 2015 data at 750 gigaelectronvolts, which had been previously detected by the ATLAS and CMS detectors, (http://www.ibtimes.com/cern-update-lhcs-bump-disappears-dashing-hopes-discovering-new-particle-2398340) did not resurface  in the much larger 2016 dataset, suggesting that it was, in all probability, the result of a statistical fluctuation.
Experiments at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois, have previously searched for excited quarks, and ruled out their existence at masses up to 870 gigaelectronvolts.
The accelerator was operated at an energy of 57.77 gigaelectronvolts to enable them to penetrate the screen without creating other particles.
Physicists at CERN first saw a signal in 2012 hinting at the unexpected appearance of two extremely short-lived objects weighing 4.38 gigaelectronvolts and 4.45 gigaelectronvolts - much heavier than a proton - during the decay of subatomic particles known as 'Lambda B' baryons, which are made up of three quarks.
Their calculations used a dark matter particle with a mass of 5 gigaelectronvolts - lighter than the one in West's simulations.