jig

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jig

jig, dance of English origin that is performed also in Ireland and Scotland. It is usually a lively dance, performed by one or more persons, with quick and irregular steps. When the jig was introduced to the United States, it was often danced in minstrel shows. In instrumental music the gigue, the successor to the jig, was used by Bach and Handel in their suites.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Jig

 

in machine building, a type of machine tool attachment used during the machining of holes on a drilling machine. The part being worked is located in or under the jig. Jig guide bushings determine the position of the cutting tool relative to the jig body and, consequently, relative to the part to be machined. The position of the hole axis of each bushing matches the position of the hole axis in the part, and the bushing hole diameter corresponds to the tool diameter. The use of a jig eliminates the marking operation, permits simultaneous machining of two or more holes, and increases labor productivity. The jig design depends on the dimensions, number, and positioning of holes and on the form and use (purpose) of the part. Parts and basic jig assemblies are standardized on a large scale in order to reduce jig manufacturing costs.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

jig

[jig]
(engineering)
A machine for dyeing piece goods by moving the cloth at full width (open width) through the dye liquor on rollers.
(mechanical engineering)
A device used to position and hold parts for machining operations and to guide the cutting tool.
(mining engineering)
A vibrating device in which coal is cleaned and ore is concentrated in water.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

jig

A device for guiding or holding a part or parts in correct mechanical alignment, either in the process of fabrication or in the final assembly of the parts.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

jig

1. any of several old rustic kicking and leaping dances
2. a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance, usually in six-eight time
3. a mechanical device designed to hold and locate a component during machining and to guide the cutting tool
4. Angling any of various spinning lures that wobble when drawn through the water
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"Dansons la gigue." D major; B3-F5; Tess: M; 6/8, Tres Vite; V/mD, P/MmD; 5 pages.
The gigue concluded a bravura performance of flawless intonation and articulation.
One Saturday he made two major debuts: as the spunky Faun in the Fall section of Robbins' The Four Seasons and that evening as the refined Gigue in Balanchine's Mozartiana.
Would Johann Pachelbel be happy to have his Canon & Gigue advertising woolly jumpers or Irish butter, or would Delibes be happy for his Dome Epais (Flower Duet) to be associated with British Airways?
Initially published as a gigue for solo piano by Oliver Ditson of Boston, the piece became best known as a regimental march performed by the Band of the Royal Newfoundland Companies and a variety of other military and civilian ensembles active in Newfoundland at the time.
The final movement was a bit mushy with insufficient attack, but the orchestral effect Ma achieved in bringing out the drone was admirable, lending this German Gigue an Irish lilt.
An unidentified reviewer praised her as an "excellent interpreter" of Bach and lauded in particular her "very beautiful performance" of the Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue on the piano and her "extraordinarily colorful" rendition of the gigue from the Partita No.
On Sunday the Queen's Hall hosts the Hexham Gathering International Concert, a new event at the festival, featuring the hall's very own folk ensemble, Gigue Fish, as well as The Halsingland Band from Sweden and bands from Italy and France on their first visit to the gathering complete the line up, showing the diversity of traditional music from across our continent.
On Sunday, the Queen's Hall hosts the Hexham Gathering International Concert, a new event at the festival, featuring the hall's very own folk ensemble, GIGUE FISH, as well as the HALSINGLAND BAND from Sweden and bands from Italy and France.
Bruce, who draws only superficially on traditional folk dance figures, has devised movements from Modern Dance (Martha Graham's technique is surely an influence) with natural pedestrian locomotion, and for such identifiable dances as a gigue he enriches the vocabulary with a saucy hip wiggle.
Although based on the social dances of the court such as the gavotte, the courante, and the gigue, these choreographed spectacles were much more elaborate affairs, with spoken verse and music interspersed with balletic entrees performed by professional dancers and select nobles.