gill cover

(redirected from gill covers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.
Related to gill covers: Opercle

gill cover

[′gil kəv·ər]
(vertebrate zoology)
The fold of skin providing external protection for the gill apparatus of most fishes; it may be stiffened by bony plates and covered with scales.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
And sportsmen who fish for northern pike with professional regularity (more than once a year, and on TV), have probably mastered the art of snatching 20-pounders under the gill covers and dragging them on board without damaging fish or fingers.
The first extracted components contains the behaviors of floating, resting at the bottom, breathing, shaking, arching, charging, and retreating, being, therefore, a component of the accessory elements of the display; the second components contains the behaviors of swimming with fins, undulating, and opening the gill covers, thus configuring a component of motility; the third components contains the behaviors of horizontal and vertical display, configuring the component of the display itself.
The statistical analysis of the entire display (two-way MANOVA, poisoning factor with inter-subject factor, sum of squares type III) revealed effects from the poisoning on the behaviors of floating, F(35.33, 6) = 2.98, p = .008; breathing, F(226.74, 6) = 2.83, p = .011; swimming with pectoral fins, F(277.60, 6) = 2.51, p = .023; undulations, F(1351.352, 6) = 3.208, p = .005; opening the gill cover, F(1315.039, 6) = 2.138, p = .051; vertical display, F(932.745, 6) = 2.503, p = .023; arching, F(169.699, 6) = 11.075, p < .001; and retreat, F(83.951, 6) = 9.906, p < .001.
Knotless nets - a legal requirement - should be used at all times and salmon should never be dragged over gravel and rocks, or held by the tail or gill covers.
Which is why it's so dramatic when such essential pride of place is used by one critic (Gill covers TV and restaurants) to take aim at his colleagues.