gill net

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Related to gillnet: purse seine

gill net

[′gil ‚net]
(engineering)
A net that entangles the gill covers of fish.
References in periodicals archive ?
Total effort was not reported; however, catch rates were low in all gillnet panels (<0.
east-southeast of the southern tip of the Kamtchatka Peninsula by a recovery of 7 specimens (48-75 cm) from a Japanese high-seas gillnet fishery (Kobayashi and Ueno, 1956).
Take action: Contact the Secretary General of the United Nations, Kofi Annan, urging him to support a United Nations moratorium on pelagic longline and gillnet fishing in the Pacific.
The 24 species identified in stomach remains of the predominantly juvenile harbor seals incidentally caught in the New England sink gillnet fishery indicate a broad prey base that varies seasonally and regionally (Williams, 1999).
He stressed the Government to devise a policy for reducing gillnets
para]]Oceana releases new PSA featuring Mara, highlighting threats of drift gillnets to marine life[[/para]]
Further, presence of nontargeted spiny dogfish can reduce the quality of target groundfish species in gillnet catches (Rafferty et al.
When belugas travel up river they are probably more susceptible to gillnet interactions due to the confined channels and potentially noisy soundscape.
The exact cause is not clear, but turtle egg harvesting, coastal gillnet fishing and longline fishing have been blamed.
Collections were made in conjunction with the white seabass gillnet monitoring program, funded by the California Department of Fish and Game Ocean Resource Enhancement and Hatchery Program, facilitated by Steve Crooke.
2) A gillnet is a net used to snare fish that try to swim into deliberately sized mesh openings but are unable to squeeze through.
Still, despite nearly two decades of protection efforts under the national park, the turtle populations are still declining, in large part because of longline fishing and by gillnet boats that trap the turtles during their migrating season near the coasts of Peru and Chile, both nations that have giant fishing industries.