bleeding

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Related to gingival bleeding: clinical diagnosis, gingival bleeding index

bleeding

[′blēd·iŋ]
(chemical engineering)
The undesirable movement of certain components of a plastic material to the surface of a finished article. Also known as migration.
(engineering)
Natural separation of a liquid from a liquid-solid or semisolid mixture; for example, separation of oil from a stored lubricating grease, or water from freshly poured concrete. Also known as bleedout.
(materials)
The outward penetration of a coloring agent from a substrate through the surface coat of paint.
The movement of grout through a pavement from below a road surfacing material to the outer surface.
(textiles)
Referring to a fabric in which the dye is not fast and therefore comes out when the fabric is wet.

bleeding

1. The upward penetration of a coloring pigment from a substrate through a topcoat of paint.
2. The oozing of grout from below a road-surfacing material to the surface in hot weather.
3. Exudation of one or more components of a sealant, with possible absorption by adjacent porous surfaces.
4. The autogenous flow of mixing water within, or its emergence from, newly placed concrete or mortar; caused by the settlement of the solid materials within the mass or by drainage of mixing water; also called water gain.
5. The diffusion of coloring matter through a coating from the substrate, or the discoloration that arises from such a process.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ability of an Herbal Mouthrinse to Reduce Gingival Bleeding. J Clin Dent.
Gingival bleeding index (GBI) (according to Alnamo and BAY 1975) was used to examine the gingiva at 2 points, mesiobuccal and buccal surfaces of six selected teeth with their substitute as follow (55/54, 52/53, 64/65, 84/85, 72/73, 75/74) 11002 surfaces were investigated.
These unfavorable oral hygiene habits had resulted in unsatisfactory level of plaque control, more gingival bleeding and trends towards deeper periodontal pockets and greater loss of clinical attachments.
(16), (17) Anecdotally, dental professionals may observe more gingival bleeding while working on patients taking dual antiplatelet therapies.
Gingival bleeding in relation to oral hygiene practices among school going girls in Peshawar.
As for dental questions, 382 children never went to a dentist (68.2%), 208 had a visible plaque at the time of interview, 96 had caries experience, and 24 had spontaneous gingival bleeding.
The primary efficacy outcome was gingival bleeding, which was assessed across the whole mouth.
Additionally, the students were queried as to sores in the mouth, gingival bleeding and hair loss with the thought that these conditions could be associated with vitamin deficiency.
Gingival recession, gingival bleeding, and dental calculus in adults 30 years of age and older in the United States, 1988-1994.
The gingival bleeding index (GBI) was defined as the percentage of sites with a GI [greater than or equal to] 2.
Gingival bleeding and abrasion are the most common soft-tissue effects of air polishing with sodium bicarbonate or other traditional powders.
This because of the fact that liver dysfunction can be presented by many oral manifestations like mucosal membrane jaundice, bleeding disorder, petechiae, bruising, gingivitis, gingival bleeding (even in response to minimal trauma), chelitis, xerostomia and oral soreness (17).