gingival crevice


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Related to gingival crevice: gingival sulcus, Gingival Crevicular Fluid

gingival crevice

[′jin·jə·vəl ′krev·əs]
(anatomy)
The space between the free margin of the gingiva and the surface of a tooth. Also known as gingival sulcus.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Griffiths, "Formation, collection and significance of gingival crevice fluid," Periodontology 2000, vol.
(4) The injectable matrix is hydrophilic and can be flushed away relatively easily from the gingival crevice. (7) Nevertheless, small traces of residue may persist and remain in the gingival crevice.
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Clinical studies indicate that primary proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) are elevated in the gingival crevice around teeth with periodontitis but the secondary cytokines and chemokines, IL-6 and IL-8, are not.
Humoral immune responses in gingival crevice fluid: local and systemic implications.
RNA can enter the oral cavity through various routes, including saliva secretions from the 3 major salivary glands (the parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands) and minor glands, gingival crevice fluid (GCF), and desquamated oral epithelial cells.
A frenum is a mucous membrane fold containing muscle and connective tissue fibers.28 It attaches the lip and the cheek to the alveolar mucosa, the gingiva and the underlying periosteum.29 The frenum may jeopar- dize gingival health when they are attached too closely to the gingival margin either because of interference with proper placement of the tooth brush or through opening of gingival crevice by muscle pull.30 Frenum attachments are classified based on its location, as: Mucosal attachment, Gingival attachment, Papillary attachment and Papillary penetrating.31 Generally the frenum is evaluated in conjunction with vestibular depth.
Immunomagnetic recovery of human neutrophil defensins from the human gingival crevice. Oral Microbiol Immunol 1999; 14:190-193.
The frena may also jeopardize the gingival health by causing a gingival recession when they are attached too closely to the gingival margin, either because of an interference with the improper placement of a toothbrush or through the opening of the gingival crevice because of a muscle pull.