graft

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graft,

in surgery: see transplantation, medicaltransplantation, medical,
surgical procedure by which a tissue or organ is removed and replaced by a corresponding part, usually from another part of the body or from another individual.
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graft

[graft]
(biology)
To unite to form a graft.
A piece of tissue transplanted from one individual to another or to a different place on the same individual.
An individual resulting from the grafting of parts.
(botany)
To unite a scion to an understock in such manner that the two grow together and continue development as a single plant without change in scion or stock.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

graft

To join a scion, shoot, or bud to the stock of another similar plant.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

graft

1. Horticulture
a. a piece of plant tissue (the scion), normally a stem, that is made to unite with an established plant (the stock), which supports and nourishes it
b. the plant resulting from the union of scion and stock
c. the point of union between the scion and the stock
2. Surgery a piece of tissue or an organ transplanted from a donor or from the patient's own body to an area of the body in need of the tissue
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, a free gingival graft surgery was performed to provide a KM in the peri-implant area, thus, minimizing the sensitivity during hygiene.
24 Drofman HS, Kennedy JE, Bird WC Longitudinal evaluation of free autogenous gingival grafts".
Despite the limitations and risks reported in the past, ITR combined with bone and gingival grafts present good results maintaining the ridge format and soft tissue contour if the appropriate surgical protocol is employed (Table 1).
Because PRP also enhances soft tissue mucosal and skin healing, it is used in connective tissue grafts, palatal grafts, gingival grafts, mucosal flaps together with Alloderm (BioHorizons, Birmingham, AL) for root coverage, skin graft donor and recipient sites, dermal fat grafts, face lifts, blepharoplasty, and laser resurfacing surgery (Fig.
Free autogenous gingival grafts, part III: utilization of grafts in the treatment of gingival recession.
Sutureless grafting has been used successfully in gingival grafts (12) and represents a similar mucosal membrane tissue environment to the conjunctiva of the eye.
[23] PRP also enhances soft tissue mucosal and skin healing, it is therefore used in connective tissue grafts, palatal grafts, gingival grafts, mucosal flaps together for root coverage, skin graft donor etc.