gingival sulcus


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gingival sulcus

[′jin·jə·vəl ′səl·kəs]
(anatomy)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The GCF represents either a serous transudate or an inflammatory exudate, depending on the status of the periodontal tissues and can easily be collected from the gingival sulcus surrounding each tooth.
Crevicular fluid is normal plasma exuded flowing through the gingival sulcus. A patient with gingivitis develops an inflammatory response with a large number of mediators involved, such as the cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 [1-6].
Rossomando, "Orthodontic forces increase tumor necrosis factor a in the human gingival sulcus," American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, vol.
The entrance point of the emphysema is the deep incision made at the buccal mucosa or gingival sulcus and pockets developed after dental procedures (8).
(2004) suggested that pre-injury and per-injury factors such as patient age, degree of root development, proximity to gingival sulcus, fragment mobility, dislocation and separation between fragments appeared to have a significant influence upon the pattern of healing.
Since gingival epithelial cells are in close proximity with microbes and their virulence factors, the response of epithelium to these insults determines the health of the gingival sulcus. Several families of antimicrobial peptides have been identified in oral cavity which includes [alpha]-defensins, [beta]-defensins, calprotectin, adrenomedullin, histatins, and cathelicidin.
It has been reported that orthodontic tooth movement increases levels of TNF-[alpha] in the gingival sulcus in humans [43, 44].
In the light of this information, one might question whether exposing the gingival sulcus after SRP--a minimally invasive, but nonetheless invasive procedure--to a light source capable of inducing ROS is a good therapeutic choice or not.
Mucoceles are benign cystic lesions of the oral cavity, which are developed from the extravasation or retention of mucin produced by the minor salivary glands, which are found throughout the surface of the oral cavity, except in the gingival sulcus; in spite of their great distribution, prevalence depends on their location.