place

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place

1. a geographical point, such as a town, city, etc.
2. 
a. an open square lined with houses of a similar type in a city or town
b. (capital when part of a street name): Grosvenor Place
3. Maths the relative position of a digit in a number
4. Horse racing
a. Brit the first, second, or third position at the finish
b. US and Canadian the first or usually the second position at the finish
c. (as modifier): a place bet
5. Theatre one of the three unities
6. another place Brit Parliamentary procedure
a. (in the House of Commons) the House of Lords
b. (in the House of Lords) the House of Commons
7. the other place Facetious
a. (at Oxford University) Cambridge University
b. (at Cambridge University) Oxford University

place

[plās]
(mathematics)
A position corresponding to a given power of the base in positional notation. Also known as column.

PLACE

Programming Language for Automatic Checkout Equipment.

["The Compiler for the Programming Language for Automatic Checkout Equipment (PLACE)", AFAPL TR-68-27, Battelle Inst, Columbus, May 1968].

Place

A function in PageMaker and other applications that allows a selection of different types of text and graphics files to be inserted within the current document. Place is similar to the Import function in other programs, but may provide additional capabilities. For example, it may be able to maintain a link to a "placed" file rather than embedding it within the document. See import.
References in periodicals archive ?
In some cases, the two fossae are separated by a non-calcified membrane that, in dry bones, gives place to an opening or foramen so called the septal foramen (supratrochlear foramen).
Petrarch's stay in Padua gives place to a detailed examination of visual cycles on the life of the saint and the history of his religious order, from the largely destroyed decoration by Guariento in the palace of the Carrara, the lords of that city, and continuing with the frescos in the Eremitani, those by Bartolo di Fredi in Montalcino and Ottavio Nelli in Gubbio, finishing with the decoration by Benozzo Gozzoli in San Gimignano, which is certainly the most famous and studied of them all.
The "other pillar of society" that every lawmaker must defend "is marriage, as a union of a man and a woman, open to life, which gives place to the natural institution of the family," he added.