glacial deposit


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glacial deposit

[¦glā·shəl di′päz·ət]
(geology)
Material carried to a point beyond its original location by a glacier.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
At that time glacial deposits in northeastern Illinois were breached, causing a great flood known as the Kankakee Torrent.
However, the third dimension of glacial deposits cannot be mapped by conventional geological methods; expensive drilling and geophysical techniques must be used." In this light, the Central Great Lakes Geologic Mapping Coalition -- composed of the USGS and the state geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Ohio -- is conducting a three-year pilot study during which 11 areas will be mapped, including Akron-Canton, Ohio; Illinois River Valley, Ill.; Allen County, Ind.; and Berrien County, Mich.
No glacial deposit, not a single stone transported by ice, has ever been recorded on or near Salisbury Plain, either in a natural context or incorporated into a building or a field boundary.
Following widespread dismissal of Agassiz's controversial claim to have discovered glacial deposits in the Amazon in 1866, the idea fell out of favour.
Older glacial deposits such as Illinoian tills typically have higher hydraulic conductivities than younger deposits such as Wisconsinan tills.
The April Trend is entirely covered by glacial deposits and has not previously been tested by diamond drilling.
Glacial deposits are either Late Wisconsinan (13,000 to 24,000 years ago) or Illinoian (130,000 to 191,000 years ago) in age.
Bedrock is up to 300 ft below glacial deposits. The dominant unit mapped is a drumlinized diamicton correlated to the Two Rivers glacial advance.
Some white lines which overlap the rocks point to calcite rocks, which are relatively common calcium carbonate, towards the west of Al Ghubra village, 5 kilometers from the oldest residues of some of the glacial deposits in Oman.
Radon typically is associated with fractured igneous and meta-igneous rocks, clay-rich glacial deposits, marine shale, carbonate soils, and uranium-bearing river and marine sediments (Gundersen et al., 1992).