glacial erosion


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glacial erosion

[¦glā·shəl ə′rō·zhən]
(geology)
Movement of soil or rock from one point to another by the action of the moving ice of a glacier. Also known as ice erosion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Considerable discussion regarded the evaluation of glacial erosion in a region covered by polythermal ice, and the subsequent sediment flux to the ocean (an extension of the international "source-to-sink" research but with an emphasis on the role of glacial dynamics).
Such a chronology infers that the weathering pits, seen today, only are remnants of larger pits subdued by glacial erosion.
The Cuillins formed 60 million years ago and the distinctive jagged outline of the main ridge is the result of glacial erosion.
Formed 60 million years ago, the distinctive jagged outline of the main ridge is the result of post-Ice Age glacial erosion.
Valleys are usually very wide and shallower, with more gentle slopes, the result of glacial erosion or meandering rivers.
However, by studying sediments recovered from a deep channel off the southwestern coast of Norway, where mud accumulated at rates some 100- to 500-times greater than the ocean average (due to glacial erosion on the adjacent continent), we have recently been able to read the record of the shifting conveyor.
Lower Palaeozoic unconformities in an intracratonic platform setting: glacial erosion versus tectonics in the eastern Murzuq Basin (southern Libya).
The festival explores raw materials from their origins inside the earth; their extraction, and their transformation through art, industry and manufacturing; taking in Neolithic rock art, glacial erosion, remnants of the coal mining and minerals industries, and today's concerns over exploitation of resources around the world.
The correspondence between the high peaks and large glaciers and an inferred 8-fold acceleration in exhumation rate at ~ 2 Ma (Arnaud et al., 1993), has led to the suggestion that enhanced exhumation is a response to glacial erosion in the Quaternary.
Here, intense glacial erosion has not only carved the surface of the mountain range, but has also elicited a structural response from deep within the mountain.