glaciolacustrine

glaciolacustrine

[¦glā·shē·ō·lə′kəs·trən]
(geology)
Pertaining to lakes fed by melting glaciers, or to the deposits forming therein.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In western Estonia, lithology is one of the most important triggers of landslides as they occur mostly in glaciolacustrine varved clay (Kohv et al.
These successive phases of advance and retreat led to the deposit and erosion of lithologically contrasted layers, including moraines, glaciolacustrine, and deltaic sediments.
Sandy soils originate from glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine deposits that are wide-spread in north-eastern Germany.
Also Identified as potential unconsolidated sources are Quaternary sand dune deposits derived from older glaciofluvial or sandy glaciolacustrine sediments and (or) sandy bedrock units that have been reworked along major rivers; and paleobeach ridges and dunes (Levson and others, 2012).
Scientific interests: Lithuanian Pleistocene glaciolacustrine, glaciofluvial sediments, their structure and composition, geological heritage, application of distant methods for the research of Quaternary sediments, archaeological camps and settlements.
glaciolacustrine Tone angesammelt (Raukas & Teedumae 1997, 125, Abb.
This Younger Dryas till formed, in part, by reworking of Late Wisconsinan glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine sediments including datable organic material (Seaman and McCoy 2008).
The lake catchment is a gently undulating glaciolacustrine or till-covered plain.
In the Pleistocene, in the age of Elster and Saale glaciations, the continental glacier penetrated the area from the north, followed by depositing of glacial and glaciofluvial poor-graded gravelly and sandy sediments of a brown, grey-brown, yellow, or reddish colour, and glaciolacustrine sediments, represented by grey-reddish, grey-brown, or reddish-brown clays and sandy clays, laminated in grey and with sandy lenticulars in places.
Generally, the concentration of eU was lower in glaciolacustrine deposits and carbonate-rich till; however, patches with higher eU concentration occurred within these deposits as well.